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ALL Clinical Trial Shows Promise in Young Adults

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Published on January 31, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • B-lineage ALL is the most common form of ALL and the standard treatment for relapsed patients is chemotherapy followed with a bone marrow transplant with the goal to get the patient into remission.
  •  In AALL1331 trial of blinatumomab (Blincyto),  it was more effective and had fewer side effects and lower death rates.

Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia  expert Dr. Patrick Brown from Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins shares information on a clinical trial that looks at blinatumomab (Blincyto) versus chemotherapy to prepare patients for a bone marrow transplant after relapse. Watch as Dr. Brown discusses the results of the trial and how it might cause a change in the standard of care for relapsed ALL patients.

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Transcript | ALL Clinical Trial Shows Promise in Young Adults

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Brown:

So what I'm most familiar with is an abstract that we're going to be presenting on Tuesday, which was a randomized trial.  And this was a trial done in patients from age one all the way up to age 30.  So we really were spanning the pediatric and the young adult age group. 

And what we—this was patients with relapsed of B-lineage ALL.  So B-lineage ALL is by far the most common type.  There's also T-lineage ALL.  And when B-lineage relapses in any patient the standard approach has been to try to put patients back in remission with chemotherapy, and then if you can get them back in remission take them to bone marrow transplant. 

Esther Schorr:

Okay. 

Dr. Brown:

So what we were wondering based on the early success with blinatumomab, which is the BiTE that's used in ALL, is whether blinatumomab (Blincyto) might be better than chemotherapy in getting patients to bone marrow transplant after they've relapsed.  

And so what we did was we enrolled patients that were between the ages of one and 30.  They received their first month of standard chemotherapy, and then they were randomized to either receive more chemotherapy or blinatumomab followed by bone marrow transplant.  And what we found was that the blinatumomab was much more effective than the chemotherapy in getting patients to transplant and in curing patients.  

So in terms of the comparison, the blinatumomab was much less toxic than chemotherapy, so much lower side effects and lower death rates, etcetera, from that.  It was better able to make patients' bone marrows go from having disease to having no disease, from being MRD-positive, we call it, to MRD-negative.  And then after transplant their survival was better.  More patients are alive.  

Andrew Schorr:

Wow.  So that's exciting.  

Dr. Brown:

It's exciting.  It basically is a change in the standard of care for how we treat patients with relapsed ALL.  And so now as a result of these data when patients come in they've got a new treatment that is less toxic, more effective, and gives them a better chance of being cured. 

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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