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CAR-T Cells - a New Treatment Option for ALL

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Published on March 15, 2016

Dr. Elias Jabbour from University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas gives a brief overview of CAR-T cells which are patient's own T cells engineered in a laboratory to cure cancer. The T cells are genetically engineered to produce special receptors on their surface called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). These engineered CAR-T cells are then infused back into the patient. They multiply in the patient's body and, with guidance from their engineered receptor, recognize and kill cancer cells that have the antigen on their surfaces.

Recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2015 Annual Meeting, at Orlando, FL.

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Transcript | CAR T-cells - a new treatment option for ALL

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Jabbour:

Furthermore for ALL we heard about the CAR-T cells, everybody is talking about what is CAR-T cells?  Essentially what we do, we take the lymphocyte from a patient, we engineer them and then we bring them back and these cells, they will be instructed to attack the leukemic cell, so it’s a very smart way.

So we collect the cells, we give some chemotherapy to minimise the disease, we infuse back the cells and we induce the T cells we took from the blood they were engineered and they were sent back and they attack the cancer cells.  So it’s a principle that can apply to multiple cancer but today we have it in ALL.  It’s still too early on, the results are really good, good responses, in paediatric better than adults but one should be very careful because we are still dealing with a lot of safety concern, what we call cytocary [?] syndrome which is very promising.

So the way for my patients, the way treatment is moving, I think we will find the cure for ALL, in my lifetime very modestly.  By adding this new target, this new compound to introduce it early on, so therefore we can minimise chemotherapy, minimise safety concern and improve the cure rate.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.