Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

How Can Steroid Therapy Help Treat Acute Leukemias?

Read Transcript

Published on March 15, 2016

Dr. Denis-Claude Roy, from the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital & Montreal University in Canada, describes how steroid therapy works and how it can help treat acute leukemias.
Recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2015 Annual Meeting in Orlando, Florida.

This program has been supported by Pfizer, through an unrestricted educational grant to the Patient Empowerment Foundation

Featuring

You might also like

Transcript | How Can Steroid Therapy Help Treat Acute Leukemias?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you

Steroids are usually used in association with chemotherapy and they are actually a form of cancer therapy because the steroids are particularly active against a sub-group of the white blood cell which are called the lymphocytes and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia it’s the lymphocytes that are sick and therefore when we administer steroids these agents are able to kill the lymphocytes so the subset of cells that is causing, that is at the root of the leukemia, so therefore it is a good agent and it gets good results.

We are also using it for a lot of other reasons, for controlling the adverse reaction, even for control of nausea.  So it is used broadly and all the doses are different for the different indications.  But for leukemia we usually use higher doses but it’s for a short period of time.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.