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What Factors Affect My Chances of a Successful ALL Treatment?

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Published on March 15, 2016

Dr. Ryan Cassaday from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center  highlights factors that can affect your treatment success. Age, other existing medical conditions and the specific type of ALL can all have an impact on how well a treatment works. Periodic hospitalisation is often needed to to deal with practical aspects of giving medication (for example frequent intravenous drug administration) as well as to handle some of the potential side effects of therapy.

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Transcript | What Factors Affect My Chances of a Successful ALL Treatment?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Cassaday:

The important thing to emphasise is that almost without exception anyone that is diagnosed with ALL can be treated with the hope of cure.  The likelihood of that outcome varies a lot depending on certain circumstances.  We’ve learned a lot over the years about how to identify which types of ALL are going to be relatively easy to treat, versus those that are not so easy to treat.  That often dictates a lot of what we expect from the treatment in terms of what the ultimate outcome is going to be, how well the disease will respond and how likely it is we’ll be able to get rid of it.  Other factors we have to consider are the overall health of the person that’s afflicted by this disease.

The unfortunate reality, even though the chemotherapy often works very well, it’s very intense treatment and it’s often very difficult to give to people that are older, or people that have a lot of medical problems.  So, that often, when we have to take those issues into effect, it often affects how likely it is that the treatment is going to work in the end.  So, not all of the treatment is necessarily has to be given in the hospital but with some of the regimens that we use patients often have to be admitted to the hospital periodically just to deal with some of the logistical issue of giving the medication, to a certain extent also to handle some of the potential side effects that can happen in the short term.  But generally it’s more logistical in nature, either because of the frequency at which the medicines are given or the intravenous route by which they to be given, it’s too difficult to do as an outpatient, these sorts of things.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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