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Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Does Age Play a Role?

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Published on January 14, 2020

Key Takeaways

Does age impact acute lymphoblastic leukemia disease course? Watch as acute leukemia expert Dr. Ryan Cassaday from the University of Washington School of Medicine discusses disease manifestation and presence of genetic abnormalities, like the Philadelphia chromosome, for younger and older ALL patient populations.

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Transcript | Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Does Age Play a Role?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:          

Many of us have seen the picture of the little kid who has ALL, or maybe on a brochure from The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, and then there are adults. And I know you predominantly treat adults with leukemia, but does it—is it different, or is it just what age it happened?

Dr. Cassaday:             

I mean fundamentally the way that the disease manifests in the symptoms and the laboratory abnormalities, those are relatively the same whether you’re 5 or 50 when you’re diagnosed with ALL. But there certainly are some differences. So, for example, the Philadelphia chromosome that I mentioned before, that’s much more common in older people that are diagnosed with ALL than in children. It’s actually quite rare in children despite ALL overall being far more common in children. So, there are some biological differences that we can see in this disease when it develops in people that are older for—by ALL perspectives.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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