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Why Is It Important to Find Out What Type of ALL I Have?

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Published on March 15, 2016

Dr. Elias Jabbour, from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, talks about the importance of identifying the different types of ALL that patients have. Thanks to improved techniques in subset identification, patient outcomes can be improved. For example, for patients with Philadelphia-positive ALL, survival increased from 1 to 3 years because we know they can be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors added to chemotherapy.

Recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) 2015 Annual Meeting, at Orlando, FL.

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Transcript | ALL subset identification for better treatment outcomes

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Jabbour:

With the biology we have today we are able to come up with different subsets where we can identify the good treatment for each subset.

For example we have the Philadelphia positive ALL, these are All with a certain chromosomal abnormalities including what we call the Philadelphia chromosome.  Historically these patients used to die within a year because of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors available like Imatinib, Dasatinib and Ponatinib today we have triggers to revival [?] for 88%.  So it is really crucial to identify these subsets because you can improve their outcome by taking a pill in addition to the chemotherapy.  So it is really crucial to know, to identify these subsets.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.