Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

AML Patient Advice: Dealing With Emotions From Loved Ones

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on May 28, 2019

An acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis can cause emotional distress for you as well as family and friends. How can patients deal with the emotional response from others? What can patients do if their partner is struggling with the diagnosis? Watch as patient advocate Jim Bond shares ways to work through anxiety, fear and worry together.  

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. We thank Celgene Corporation, Daiichi Sankyo, Genentech, Helsinn and Novartis for their support. These organizations have no editorial control. It is produced solely by Patient Power.

Featuring

Partners

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS)

Sponsors

Patient Empowerment Network

You might also like

Transcript | AML Patient Advice: Dealing With Emotions From Loved Ones

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Beth Probert:

So, I would like to take a few questions that we’ve received, and, Jim, I’d like to hear your feedback on this one. And the viewer asked, “People keep asking me how I’m doing, and it just makes me worry more.” Do you have any advice, Jim, for people to tell those that love them and just want to help them that all these questions are causing anxiety, what would you suggest, Jim?

Jim Bond:                   

Yeah, a couple things that I’ve found useful. I explain to them I just got done with playing nine holes of golf, or I just got done exercising, and I’m quick turn it back and say, “How are you doing?” and try to get as much out of the other person, so that they understand that I’m comfortable in my skin, and I’m not stressing out or how things are going. 

But it’s easy for people to understand that, hey, this guy’s got an incurable deadly blood cancer, or two, and we worry about him. So, I try to just loosen up, and turn it back on them, and hopefully they get more reassurance that, hey, the guy’s not stressing out, he’s okay. But you know, once you do all you can do, the rest of it is just fate, luck, whatever. So, that’s what we try to do. 

Beth Probert:               

I love that response. And people mean well, but putting the focus back on them is just fabulous. That’s really great, thank you, Jim. And Jim, I'm wondering if you have some advice about this question. And it is, "My partner's often struggling deeply with the diagnosis. I don't know the right words to say to help him feel better." Could you give some advice to this topic, Jim?

Jim Bond:                   

Yes. The weekend I was diagnosed, the very qualified oncologist rightly said in response to my question, "How long do you think I'll live?" He said, "At most you'll live three years." And so, I struggled, my wife struggled, I was in my early 40s, that weekend was hell. And here's what got me out of my funk and got us back to problem solving and putting this thing on our agenda to do all we can. I looked back at my own life, here I am in my 40s, two boys, I've been healthy most all my life. And I thought of, there was a real setback, medically I had, a bad injury playing sports when I was in high school, and to me as a high school kid, that was the end of my life. Sport was gone; a lot of recuperation. 

And as I looked back on that with this cancer diagnosis, I said, "You know what, as tough as that was at the time, as devastating as that was, a lot of good things happened because of that setback." Real things. Like it got me studying a lot more in college, I got a nice job as a result of it. Lots of good things happened. It caused me to overcome things, and I said to myself and my wife, "Hey, we're gonna make this deadly cancer diagnosis the same thing." And like all of us I think have been saying: every case is unique.

So, I don’t get bummed out when people give me their prognosis or whatever, or I read something that's not good. My case is different than everybody else, and we can look at it that way. And in the end, this can happen to any of us. So, it got me off my back, it got us in there fighting, and that's the way I look at it.             

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

You might also like