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Genetic Re-Testing for AML: Can Patients Develop New Driver Mutations?

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Published on July 17, 2019

Can an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient’s genetic profile change over time? Should genetic tests be repeated? Tune in to hear AML expert Dr. Uma Borate, from Oregon Health & Science University,discuss the potential of acquiring new mutations and give recommendations for testing.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene, Daiichi Sankyo, Jazz Pharmaceuticals and Novartis for their support. These organizations have no editorial control

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Transcript | Genetic Re-Testing for AML: Can Patients Develop New Driver Mutations?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

But cancer is wily, and the cells can change, and the cancer gene that was driving your AML on day one could be different on day 50 or 100.   

Because you're absolutely right.  The disease is wily.  It does change.  The mutation that was driving your disease to begin with may not be the one driving it when it relapses, and I think that's really where we need more information, and we need to have this testing done in order to treat the patient appropriately. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.