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Improving Statistics on AML Patient Quality of Life

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Published on June 19, 2019

How has quality of life changed for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with advances in treatment research? AML expert Dr. Uma Borate, from Oregon Health & Science University, shares an encouraging and hopeful message on overall survival and AML health outcomes.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene, Daiichi Sankyo, Jazz Pharmaceuticals and Novartis for their support. These organizations have no editorial control. Is is produced solely by Patient Power.

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Transcript | Improving Statistics on AML Patient Quality of Life

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So at this interim stage, Dr. Borate, one key question:  Don talked about the statistics, which were not good when he was diagnosed.  

Dr. Borate:

Yeah.  

Andrew Schorr:

Are you seeing a change in quality of life, and you believe in survival based on everything you're talking about?  

Dr. Borate:

Yep.  I've seen a huge change in quality of life.  And I will say interestingly in AML more than any other disease we have really pushed this aspect in our older patients.  Because we have heard loud and clear from patients who are 70, 75, 80, that they want to live.  They want to live as long as possible, but they also don't want to spend all that time in a doctor's waiting room in or the hospital.  They are very, very determined to have a good quality of life and enjoy whatever it is that they want to do.  

And I think we have really worked hard to deliver that with our targeted therapies, and I want to say the results are astounding.  I have an 89-year-old right now who celebrated his birthday and has been outpatient for the last year since his diagnosis.  An 85--oh, an 86-year-old, and we celebrated her birthday on (inaudible?) where she took a pill for 13 months and is in remission and is talking about taking a trip to Bolivia.  

So to me these are huge success stories for my patients because I have a soft corner for my older patients. They have struggled, they have sort of supported their kids their whole life, and it's their time now.  And I think that's so important to deliver that to them.  

Andrew Schorr:

Don Armstrong:

On this side of the screen I am smiling so, so huge, and I'm actually very emotional about it.  It's great to hear what Dr. Borate is saying because it gives other people a lot of hope and encouragement.  It's just great to hear because it was not an experience that I would want anyone to go through, and so these are big moments. So thank you, Dr. Borate, for what you're doing. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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