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Navigating AML: Diagnosis, Treatment and Supportive Care

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Published on March 27, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • AML treatment has more options than ever before. There are now specific drugs designed for patients age 75+, genomic testing allows doctors to personalize treatments, and social media is allowing for more patient support.
  • People are not statistics. Avoid making predictions about patient outcomes based on generalized knowledge. There are currently eight new AML drugs that are beating the historical odds for AML.
  • It is important to communicate concerns with your medical team, often they can reassure a patient or care partner about unexpected test results or symptoms.

An acute myeloid leukemia diagnosis can be a shock, but there is a community of patients, care partners and medical experts to help patients and families learn about and deal with the disease.  

Dr. Eunice Wang, from Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, and AML survivor Steve Buechler join Patient Power Co-Founder Andrew Schorr in an uplifting conversation about how to navigate AML in a way that sustains the person, not just the patient. 

Watch as Steve and Dr. Wang offer invaluable advice about each stage of treatment and the difference supportive care can make in a patient’s outcome. 

This is a Patient Power program. We thank AbbVie Inc. and Genentech, Inc. for their support. These organizations have no editorial control, and Patient Power is solely responsible for program content.

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Transcript | Navigating AML: Diagnosis, Treatment and Supportive Care

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:
Hello and welcome to Patient Power. I'm Andrew Schorr in sunny Southern California, but as we do this, it's winter time, and we're going to skip around to some colder places, but not too cold. First to Eden Prairie, Minnesota, I want to welcome back to Patient Power an AML patient, a survivor who's doing great, Steve Buechler. Steve, welcome back to Patient Power.

Steve Buechler:
Thank you.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. And you're doing well?

Steve Buechler:
I'm doing well.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. Also joining us is a renowned acute leukemia expert. She is the chief of the leukemia service at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. Welcome back to Patient Power, Dr. Eunice Wang.

Dr. Wang:
I'm very happy to be here. Thank you for the opportunity.

Andrew Schorr:
Thank you so much. Okay. Well, what we're talking about for families who are affected by AML is navigating this AML journey which has become more complicated, thank goodness, because there are more options. There've been trials. There are ongoing trials. Dr. Wang has been very involved in so much of it. And so it creates new options and new things to discuss and yet at a time when people are acutely sick. And so, Steve, let's just talk about that for a minute. So going back to June of 2016, so almost four years ago now as we record this, you went from being a healthy guy to being rapidly in the hospital. Just a quick crash, right?

Steve Buechler:
Indeed. The only thing that was amiss was my white blood cell count was low and that was discovered in a routine physical. So they said, "Go to a hematologist, have a biopsy done." The biopsy was on a Monday. I was feeling perfectly healthy. They called me on Wednesday and said, "You're seriously sick. Get to a hospital." On Friday, I started chemotherapy. So they had me into treatment before I even understood really what was going on.

Andrew Schorr:
Wow. Now, this journey went on over the course of several months, and eventually you were in a clinical trial for something pretty cool, stem cells from cord blood. From two cord bloods, which I think you referred to as Ralph. And in your case, it worked and you have not had rejection of it or sort of rejection-like affects, graft-versus-host disease. And today, how are you doing?

Steve Buechler:
I'm doing great. I feel as good or better than I did before this whole episode happened.

Andrew Schorr:
Wow. Okay. Now, Dr. Wang, let's put this in perspective. The journey for people affected by AML varies, right? There are different types of AML, different genomic types, and you have different ways of going. So when somebody is first diagnosed, is the first part of navigation to figure out what is their AML story?

Dr. Wang:
Exactly, Andrew. So when we have a patient that comes in that we suspect might have an acute leukemia, we do the same thing that Steve experienced where we call them up. We say, "Your blood counts are abnormal. Come on in." And we end up doing blood work, and in many cases a bone marrow biopsy. That's to typically to confirm the diagnosis. But the diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia requires a number of different tests. It requires us not only to look at the leukemia cells and identify them as leukemia cells, but also to do genetic testing, to look at the DNA for DNA damage, to look at the chromosomes, to look for mutations, and in many cases to look for proteins that are expressed on the leukemia cell surface. Then in general, nowadays, because of the number of different drugs that we have, we have drugs that target specific mutations and that work better in certain genetic subtypes.

So, when we have somebody come in, the first thing they want to know is, do they have acute leukemia? And the second thing they want to know is how we're going to treat it. And so having all that information at the time of diagnosis and then waiting even a few days for it, even though it's agonizing to wait, is really important, because it can dramatically affect how we're going to treat and what options we have for individuals like Steve. And as he said, he was told on Monday something was wrong. On Wednesday, he was in the hospital, and Friday they started treatment. Now, the old days, that was even a few years ago, we thought that acute leukemia was an emergency, and we had to get started right away. Nowadays, because we have a lot of options, we might wait a few more days to get the information that we need.

Andrew Schorr:
So, Steve, you were a pretty active guy and in good shape, healthy with no real illness. So I think you were a swimmer, and you were very active guy. I know you were with your friends playing poker. You're doing lots of stuff when this diagnosis happened. So how old were you, and how active were you when you were diagnosed?

Steve Buechler:
I was 64 at the time and doing all the things you mentioned and more. I just had no clue that there was anything, anything wrong. In fact, I went in for the biopsy because I thought, "I should do what my doctors say. I'll do it to humor them." And lo and behold, they found something much more serious. But it took a while for me to even appreciate the seriousness of what was going on. Like I said, they rushed me into the hospital and said, "You have to do this right away." They were right at the time for the tools they had. I think this was just before a lot of the new drugs had come out. This was the old standard 7+3 treatment. And they explained very carefully, "This is how it's supposed to work. And this is what we're trying to achieve. And oh, by the way, you'll probably be here for about five weeks, because you're going to get really sick because of immunosuppression." And they were right on every account.

Andrew Schorr:
Now, this was a year before you were planning to retire as a sociology professor—but an active guy and probably with your wife looking forward to an enjoyable act of retirement.

So, Dr. Wang, that's what I want to ask you about next is the health of the patient, overall health of the patient in the age. So you talked about getting a clear picture of clinically what's going on genomically, all that kind of stuff. And what about if they have other conditions, if they're already in such great shape, where does that come into play?

Dr. Wang:
So that's very important. Then as you may or may not know, the majority of patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia are in their late 60s, 70s, 80s and even 90s. And there's a lot of variability. As Steve said, he was 64 years old. And in that situation, there could be people that are very fit or running marathons or hardly have any medical issues. There could also be people in their 60s and 70s or 80s that are significantly impaired, that are in a nursing home, that have cognitive changes, heart disease, lung disease, diabetes, high blood pressure. So the functional status or what we call the performance status of the patient makes a big difference. We know that as Steve was saying, they gave him an intensive 7+3 chemotherapy regimen, wiped out his blood counts, told him he was going to be in the hospital for five weeks and he was going to get horribly sick, right?

There are some people that they can't tolerate that. They would not survive that type of therapy. So one of the things that we do at the diagnosis—and we used to focus more on age, but nowadays I think we focus more on the individual patient. We try to get a sense as you did from talking to Steve, like how functional they are, how active they are. If they're on 20 pills or no pills, if they're traveling or whether they're using a walker or oxygen. And those medical problems are really going to impact us because as physicians, we don't want to harm the patient. So if the patient already has significant medical problems, that may significantly influence what we're going to offer and what we're going to talk about. And also, we need to talk to the patient, what do they desire? What do they desire from the next few years of treatment?

Andrew Schorr:
So is a long hospitalization always part of it? Now you have an age of you have some oral therapies as well, can somebody be at home? How does that work?

Dr. Wang:
For treatment of AML, there are a number of different options which can be given almost entirely outpatient or at home. We have a pill called enasidenib (Idhifa), which is a once-a-day pill. So that if you have patients that have a certain mutation in their AML, they could be eligible to just get a pill to take it home. We have other combination therapies where we combine a pill with low-dose chemotherapy. We have two drug regimens that are specifically designed for individuals above the age of 75, the first time in cancer therapy that we'd have any drugs specifically for that age category or for people that are older. So we have probably half of our treatment options involve intensive chemo with that 7+3 or similar, and half now involve pills or combinations of pills with other low-dose chemo that can be given 100 percent at home. So obviously with many, many options now determining, individualizing the therapy for the patient, I think, and the disease is crucial to making those decisions in this current era.

Andrew Schorr:
So, Steve, you've been very devoted to helping other patients. So now things are changing. What do you tell people when you encounter somebody new? Maybe a husband and wife, or an older person and adult child, what do you tell them about this journey they're going to be on?

Steve Buechler:
Well, I kind of get a sense of what their questions and concerns are. And I sort of caution that I can only tell them my story, but increasingly I can share the stories of lots and lots of different patients. And I think if they're in their initial stages, there's some process that they need to go through that I sort of call normalization. I mean, when this happens to you, it's a tremendous shock, but somehow it's reassuring to know all over the country, thousands of patients and hundreds of facilities are dealing with this issue on a daily basis, and there are new treatments and new ways of addressing it.

So, giving people some reassurance that this is not an unfamiliar problem to the medical specialists who are working at it. And certainly in my case, I had a terrific group of doctors, and they were clearly right in their element. They knew what they were doing. They couldn't guarantee the outcome, but I was comfortable very early on that if this thing could be solved, these people would do it. Both at my first hospital for induction and subsequently at my transplant hospital, I couldn't have asked for better care, which really put me at ease throughout the whole process.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. So, Dr. Wang, you have those conversations. I don't know that somebody can be relaxed, but how do you try to help them feel more confident?

Dr. Wang:
I think that just like Steve was saying, we like to assure them like for example that, "We have a team here. We have six doctors. All we do is we take care of leukemia patients. We have a dedicated ward. We have dedicated nurse practitioners, research advisors. We have clinical trials." I try it at a personal level saying that I am their doctor. I am respecting what they wish. That it's going to be a team effort to get them through this and that I always will defer to them as to what they decide they want to do. But I think that I make recommendations and I tell them, "I'm going to be honest with you. I'm going to help you through this. We're going to get through this together. We will provide support. We will answer your questions. Whatever you and your family need."

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. Now, there are resources. So for instance, The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is very devoted to this. They have an information resource center. They have a whole Beat AML initiative trying to push research forward as well. Many organizations are in the pharmaceutical companies, of course, and there's been a lot of progress. Steve, people are terrified with this diagnosis for themselves or a loved one. So your message is really one of hope. It's communication with a team like Dr. Wang said, and speaking up, right? But it is a hopeful message, isn't it?

Steve Buechler:
It is. And I think what helped me, I've come to understand this in retrospect, is that my doctors did not offer nor did I ask about really hard statistics about survival and prognosis. It was almost like we got an unspoken pack that, "We're just not going to talk about that.” We'll talk about treatment, what we're trying to accomplish, and it was only much later that I came to appreciate how and what kind of risk I really was at. And there was actually an earlier program that you folks did where they did some studies with AML patients and they said, "The more they knew about their disease and their prognosis, the more depression and sadness they felt." So I kind of stumbled my way into I think a healthy, "There's stuff I want to know, but there's stuff just as well I don't know," until I got to transplant.

And at that point, I heard the first hard numbers about, "You can do more chemo, or you can do transplant, and the survival rates look like this, and they were pretty grim both ways." At that point, I needed that information to make an informed decision. But I was just as glad I hadn't heard it up until that point, because the point was to get me through induction, get me to recover from immunosuppression. Look at the options, look at the testing of the cancer. Make that decision between chemo versus transplant. And I was put in an intermediate risk category. So that was not really helpful in terms of that decision. So I went back and talked to my induction oncologist. I talked to the Mayo Clinic and got second opinions. Everything was kind of pointing me towards transplant.

My final logic was that if I had the chemotherapy route and it didn't work out, I'd forever regret not getting a transplant. But if I did the transplant and it didn't work out, well, then it just wasn't meant to be. So I arrived in a very peaceful place in terms of that process. But it required the input of lots of doctors and nurses and social workers and my own thinking and researching. But once we just said, "Okay, let's do the transplant. Off we go. Find a donor, get a trial, etcetera." And so we went.

Andrew Schorr:
Let's mention by the way that Steve for I think 31 years was a sociology college professor. So he's used to doing research. He's a pretty smart guy. Not everybody has that background and they're going to rely on a team like Dr. Wang and her team. We'll put in a little pitch that if you or a loved one are diagnosed with AML and you're probably watching, because that is you, hopefully, you're at least in consultation with a group where there are AML specialists like Dr. Wang. So that this changing landscape is brought to bear for you and that the assessment can be made with the genes, with the medicines, with your health status you were talking about.

So, Dr. Wang, let's talk a little bit about the journey people are on. So if they opened a book from not too long ago about AML, the statistics would not look so hot. But you and your colleagues have been rewriting history along with patients. So what do you tell people when they walk in or a family member does and say, "Well, the statistics say this." Do you say, "You're not a statistic?" Or how do you approach that?

Dr. Wang:
I agree with Steve. I mean, I think that people are not statistics, they're not numbers. Those are averages of hundreds, even thousands of patients. I tell my patients—and we're in an era now, let's be honest, Andrew, if you come up with a new diagnosis or there's something unfamiliar with it, you're going to Google it. You're going to open your browser on your smartphone. You're going to type it in, and you're going to get this slew of information. And most of the information when people look up—and I tell them, "If you go and look this up on a search engine, you type like AML, you're going to get information. That doesn't tell you how that applies to your case. Well, who's going to tell you how you're going to do, how your disease is for you is your physician, your oncologist. Your doctor knows your disease, what you're doing, how you're doing, what side effects you're getting."

So, I ask people not to generalize and use information that's on the web and apply it to individual patients or family members or even themselves. We are beating the odds. We have had eight new drugs for acute myeloid leukemia approved in the last two years since 2017. The success rate that we have with this cancer has not yet been translated into those statistical outcomes that take two, five, 10 years to change some of those statistics. We're also looking at specific subtypes of leukemia, and you may have a specific subtype that's going to do extraordinarily well.

I say to them, "I'm going to start you on. We're going to sit down. We're going to discuss the options of toxicity. We're going to start you on a therapy, and we'll see how it goes. If you do well, then we'll continue. If you're not going to do well, we'll change. We're going to recommend the best path for you. But for you to pull up those statistics and think that you're going to be X, Y and Z, they're not applicable to individual people. I've had patients that have lived for years past their expected or their median survival. Those don't apply to individuals, to people that we care about." That's what I tell them.

Andrew Schorr:
That is so important for people that don't know. If you believe that medical science like what they're doing at Roswell Park and at other top centers around the world, if that is making progress, then why shouldn't that be changing the story? And it has been changing it in the AML. Steve, I know you talk to people about that and that gives them hope. Okay, I want to move on. We've talked about like Steve's diagnosis or people almost with the assumption of the initial diagnosis, but hopefully you get a remission. But then you're still on a journey. So, Dr. Wang, let me—well, let me ask you, Steve, right now you go every so often to the doctor, but you're never really sure whether another shoe's going to drop, right? I mean, that's in the back of your mind somewhere.

Steve Buechler:
It is indeed in the back of my mind although the further out I get, the more comfortable I am. But one of the tools that got me through this whole process was relying on what I learned about mindfulness and meditation and yoga—staying in the present moment and arriving at a place where I could get very anxious and very worried about the next test result or the next decision point or the next fork in the road. But unless I can influence it or control it in some way, there's no point in doing that. It is easier said than done, but I would simply tell myself, "Look, wait until you have the information that you need. We'll figure out what to do at that point."

I felt I was in very good hands with my doctors, and I was able to achieve a fair amount of just calmness and peacefulness about that and some confidence that the people taking care of me would know how to deal with whatever eventualities might crop up. It is easier said than done, but I didn't lose a lot of sleep worrying about the long-term future just because I had these tools. I could do a lot of physical activity. I was a proactive patient. I did a lot of writing. I used a lot of humor. I devised a lot of strategies that didn't necessarily contribute to my physical survival, but they certainly sustained me as a person and not just a patient as I was going through this process. And the feedback I got from the people I was writing to was really, really crucial in that lots and lots of people supported me, and that's very powerful.

Andrew Schorr:
Mm-hmm. Dr. Wang, let's talk about this journey people run. Steve has rattled off some strategies he said to help him post-double cord transplant and all that and the checkups. How do you talk to people—let's say they're not in the hospital, or they're out of the hospital, or they're taking these pills—about just how to think about the future knowing that maybe the leukemia hasn't been cured, but it's been knocked way back?

Dr. Wang:
I think it's important to have a good supportive network for these individuals. I think whether it'd be caregivers or family members or even communities. We have a lot of patients that reach out online or through blogs or social media to feel like part of a community. We as physicians, we make ourselves available. I think communication is key with the primary oncologist. I tell my patients, "In between visits, you may have days that you wake up and you're certain the disease is coming back. If for any reason at all you want to call me, you want to come in, you want me to check your blood work, you want us to see you just to make sure," we offer that to our patients.

But we encourage them as they get further out to join survivor groups, to join blogs, to take meditation. We offer at our center survivorship services. We have physical therapy and nutritionists and acupuncturists. People that help with psychosocial issues. I think that as you get away from the acute medical problems, taking care of yourself and taking care of these chronic things I think is really important. And having a community and communication with your physicians, I think, is key.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. Now, Steve, I know when you were going through all this, you were sending out emails like crazy to keep people informed. I'm sure your wife was part of that as maybe a co-communications manager. And often when you're going through a transplant or chemo, it's tough for the patient to do themselves. What would you say as far as communication with others who want to know how you're doing and also accepting support, being open to support?

Steve Buechler:
What I learned fairly early on is that I thought I was trying to keep people informed about my situation, but doing that required me to understand my own experience and my prognosis and all the things that were going on much more clearly than if I hadn't been trying to communicate it to other people. So writing for others really became therapy for me. And it forced me to grapple with, "What's really going on? How do I understand this? How do I put it into words? How do I communicate it?" And for me as a social scientist, as an academic, if I can understand something, I can usually get pretty comfortable with it. And so that understanding arose out of that writing and the responses I got from people.

So, for me, that was a very, very useful therapeutic tool. That might not be everybody's cup of tea, but a lot of people will use CaringBridge and you can simply report the medical facts. But I ended up engaging a lot of reflections about what it meant to be a cancer patient and how it was affecting my identity and just a whole slew of things that I processed through writing for an audience. I've never been a journal writer because it's too solipsistic. The same person that writes is the only person that reads. What's the point? But writing for others brought in a whole new dynamic for me and was very, very helpful.

Andrew Schorr:
And you wrote a memoir. How can people see that?

Steve Buechler:
It's available. The title is How Steve Became Ralph: A Cancer/Stem Cell Odyssey (With Jokes). Every email that went out had a joke at the end of it to boy up my spirits and those of my readers. It's on Amazon. It's available from the publisher. Maybe we can attach some marketing information after it's on this but it's out there and people have found it pretty helpful. It's not that I'm a cheerleader saying you have to always be positive. In my case, the optimism is sort of in the facts of what happened to me. I mean, I just had an extremely good ride. Successful induction, successful engraftment, no graft versus host disease. Simply telling people that story wherever they are in the midst of a journey they find really very, very encouraging. I said, "Hey. Past results don't guarantee future outcomes. But I had a really good ride. It's possible and here's how I navigated it as best I could."

Andrew Schorr:
Dr. Wang, I want to ask you about something though. Not everybody has such a good ride or they are maybe more of a glass half empty person. We were talking a lot about treating leukemia and you talked about things that people could do, meditation and support from others. Sometimes people are affected when they're diagnosed with a cancer by anxiety and depression. So these conversations with your team sometimes can be broader or it could be your spouse or someone else who's close to you who your diagnosis kind of puts them over the edge. So this transparency, this relationship with your team on everything that's going on should happen?

Dr. Wang:
Yes. I would encourage you and your family and your spouse, your children, your siblings, to all become involved in the process. Oftentimes for patients, it would be helpful to have an advocate, somebody that comes with them to all their appointments. I recommend when you are anxious and upset, it kind of goes in one ear and out the other. It's great to have somebody there taking notes. It's great to have somebody that brings questions, writes them down, brings them to the appointment, asks them. I make myself available to the family to talk about these things. But having the communication, having the support I think is important. One of the things that we offer a lot are our clinical trials, so sometimes patients who are doing well or don't doing well, a lot of times even if we can't help them, we are supporting them.

We never abandon a patient. We always stay with them, whatever they want, transfusions. And we offer clinical trials, which I think part of my job is to offer that hope to change as you said. Making cancer history, changing the outcomes, changing those statistics. I really believe that had Steve come in even a few years or a year beforehand and he wasn't eligible or didn't have the option of the clinical trial, he might not be on the call with us today. And he says he's extraordinarily lucky. But he at every step got himself involved, got himself educated. Did the meditation apps, got himself through, made the decisions, got the second opinions. I mean, he is in some ways the ideal patient, and we wish other patients would also do that, wish they'd participate in the trial, get self-informed, being involved, self-reflecting. Those are things that can make this journey tolerable for many of us, and we'll support you through that. But his case is not just that he's lucky. He did a lot to make himself where he is now. I just wanted to point that out.

Andrew Schorr:
There you are. Well, Dr. Wang, you just ticked off some very specific things people could do. I want to chime in with one of the thing all of us, and I'm a leukemia survivor too with chronic leukemia, have blood tests. Steve as in occasionally follow up and people certainly as they go out from their AML treatment or their ongoing treatment, you will be monitored. Don't get crazy if the numbers vary a little bit from time to time, right, doc? Because that's crazy-making, right?

Dr. Wang:
Right. I mean, I think that in our center, we actually make patient's lab values available online in that patient portal. And sometimes, people look them up and yeah, they get a lot of anxieties. So we always tell them, "Look, give us a call. We'll let you know if there's something to worry about. I know people that have been in remission for years and the morning they come in to get their labs drawn, their blood pressure spikes, because you always have that fear. We always are happy to look at your labs and provide that assurance, but don't freak out until you talk to us. We know what it's like. We will let you know." That's true.

Andrew Schorr:
Right. You all look at the trends.

Dr. Wang:
We look at the trends. One time, I don't care about a little bit blip. And I call a trend three things in a row, okay? So one little blip, I'm not necessarily going to do something about. So I just try to—right? I don't know what Steve's experience is, but yes.

Andrew Schorr:
Well, Steve, you seem to be a pretty mellow about this now.

Steve Buechler:
Well, I guess you learn something when you go through it. Yeah, yeah. I was a person who had some anxiety issues beforehand, but for whatever reason, this was like too big to be anxious about somehow. It's hard to put into words, but it just called forth a whole different response from me. And as I said, I just become conversant with mindfulness and meditation, and that was a very powerful tool. And I feel like I've now integrated that into the rest of my life. But again, when you have an outcome as good as this, maybe that's a little easier. I felt like there was often a positive upward spiral. I never felt all that sick except for the effects of the chemo. So I felt good enough to do exercise, to walk the halls, to be as active as I possibly could, which in turn gave me energy, and it got me out and connected with people. I would chat with people I saw in the hallways, and it was just a lot of good things reinforcing one another.

And I know that can go the other way. If people are too debilitated or too sick to do those kinds of things and you can only be a patient in a bed and there's the deconditioning, so there are downward spirals as well. But anything people can do or others can help you do to get into one of those positive upward spirals, it just feels really, really as healthy as you can feel even though you're really, really sick.

Andrew Schorr:
All right. I'm just going to share two stories, and then we're going to let everybody go. One is I know a man who was hospitalized for this actually in Australia and he said, "My hospitalization, I'm going to make as much as in my mind like going on vacation." So he wore a Hawaiian shirt. They put Hawaiian things on the wall and when he could, when the doctors came in, Eunice, they had to wear a lei around their neck.

Dr. Wang:
That's great. That's wonderful. That’s so uplifting.

Andrew Schorr:
Yeah. And then the other story is, and this is a man from outside Minneapolis, he wasn't big on hospital food. His neighbors got together, and they actually had food regularly, things he really liked brought in to him—so whatever you can that makes a difference for you to help you feel that you are more in control, right?

Dr. Wang:
I think that's important.

Steve Buechler:
It's huge. Yeah.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. So we've covered a lot of ground. Steve, I want to wish you all the best—great check-ups forever, okay?

Steve Buechler:
Thank you.

Andrew Schorr:
Thank you for being with us on Patient Power once again. Dr. Eunice Wang from Roswell Park, thank you for your team there and the research you do, and the articles you write—and really participating and helping us all be a little more upbeat as we rewrite history in AML. Thanks for being with us.

Dr. Wang:
Thank you.

Andrew Schorr:
Okay. Andrew Schorr with some wonderful people—Steve in Minnesota, Dr. Wang in Roswell Park in Buffalo. And remember, knowledge can be the best medicine of all. Thanks for joining us.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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