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What Can You Do Outside of the Clinic to Help You Manage AML?

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Published on March 15, 2016

Dr. Alan Burnett from Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK provides advice on what patients can do outside the clinic to help manage acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The advice covers topics such as herbal medicines, nutrition, exercise and how to reduce exposure to infections.

Recorded at the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting 2015, in Orlando, FL.

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Transcript | What Can You Do Outside of the Clinic to Help You Manage AML?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Burnett:

Quite a lot of patients are interested in herbal medicine.   As you know, we probably don’t know of any objective evidence that that makes much difference but, you know, I think it should be… I don’t think doctors generally would object if people feel they’ll benefit from it, but I think they should know that their patient is wanting to take this or that.  And there are one or two that might interfere with the drugs intended, so that’s important.

Nutrition is important, and obviously chemotherapy does reduce your willingness to eat, so you’ve just got to try your best; it’s not going to taste like a Michelin restaurant for a while, and your taste will go.  So expect that but still shove in the food.  Exercise, where possible, I think, is good, without exposing yourself to a cold environment where you might, because you are susceptible to infection.

Keeping away from animals licking you, grandchildren crawling all over you with infections from the playschool. So anyone who’s got an infection should keep their distance from a patient while they’re on chemotherapy and at home, because they are susceptible to picking up treatment.  If you do feel unwell, take the temperature, it may be you are brewing up an infection and you certainly don’t want to sit on that because these infections can become serious very quickly, and it’s important to contact the hospital and get in there, and they’ll give you antibiotics and nip it in the bud, that’s the idea.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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