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AML Frontline and Relapsed Setting Strategies

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Published on February 25, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • It’s important to determine that the current therapy has actually failed to deliver results, sometimes the therapy just needs more time. 
  • Genomic re-testing can determine if something about the disease or mutation profile has changed, which can help determine the next best therapy. 

Dr. Hetty Carraway, from the Cleveland Clinic, discusses some options for acute myeloid leukemia patients who have tried new treatments, either alone or in combination, and aren’t seeing results. She explains that the first step is to determine that the treatment has actually failed, as responses are often not seen as quickly as one would hope.

Dr. Carraway also shares why it’s important to re-test for mutations before asking, “What’s the next best therapy?" Watch now to find out more. 

This is a Patient Power program. We thank AbbVie Inc. and Genentech, Inc. for their support. These organizations have no editorial control, and Patient Power is solely responsible for program content.

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Transcript | AML Frontline and Relapsed Setting Strategies

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:         

Okay, so, Dr. Carraway, so let’s say you try one of these combinations or a certain drug. If you’re measuring and you’re seeing, you’re not getting the response you want, do you have another horse to ride? Do you have another choice?

Dr. Carraway:            

That’s a great question. I think I always go back to, “Are we really convinced that we’ve failed the first therapy?” These therapies, we want them to work quickly, and I think one of the first principles is that they don’t often work quickly alone. So, we talked a little bit in the up-front setting that you can use some of these agents even in the relapse setting, we’re able to use some of these targeted agents as well. So, venetoclax (Venclexta) has really changed things for many of our patients, even in the up-front and in the relapsed setting for patients. What we’re struggling with now, is, what’s the next best therapy after people have failed these agents. But we really need to clarify those populations, and again, what ends up being very important is, when the drugs have failed the patients, that molecular profile, that mutation profile, again becomes important, because it can be different… 

Andrew Schorr:         

Test again.

Dr. Carraway:            

…at the time of relapse, compared to the time of presentation.

Andrew Schorr:         

So, this is genomic testing, is that what we’re talking about?

Dr. Carraway:            

Mm-hmm. 

Andrew Schorr:         

In other words, not genes that affect the color of your eyes or whether you have hair or not, and go bald like your father or mother, but it’s cancer genes.

Dr. Carraway:            

Mostly, yeah genes that are allowing tumors to progress and cause leukemia.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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