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How to Manage the Side Effects of Chemo and Other Treatments

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Published on October 12, 2016

Cancer treatments can be overwhelming. Not only psychologically, but physically. In this video, Jo Taylor, a breast cancer survivor, talks about her strategies to cope with the side effects of chemotherapy. She mentions primarily maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle. This can involve actively participating in sports events, such as bike rides and walks, or through a healthy and balanced diet.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jo Taylor:

Chemotherapy just completely wipes you out. So actually dealing day to day with normal things like dealing with your children, making food, just makes you feel really poorly. Nosebleeds, skin changes, just lots of different things that it actually causes.

I’ve always exercised. I’ve always dieted and exercised. It’s always been like a way of life to me. But going through treatment, I think it’s a really really important part of dealing with your treatments, being able to get through treatment. Because people do put weight on, people do get inactive because of the treatment, because they’ve got to go to bed, because they’re tired, and because they’re fatigued. You know, and because of all these issues, they’re not as active, and they’re not losing weight or able to be as active as they could have been.

But I think, you know, that it’s got to be a way of life. It’s got to be something you do and you want to do, and it can help you with the side effects of the treatments, like tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamox) or some of the aromatase inhibitors that there are.You know, menopausal symptoms, it can help with them. It can also like say help with the weight gain because you’re exercising you’re able to lose that weight that you’ve gained through chemotherapy. I know people who have gained four of five stones through treatments alone. So exercise is a big thing to help with that side.

Try to eat healthily on a daily basis. I mean again I think it’s just a way of life. You’ve got to eat healthily. When you’re going through chemotherapy, you don’t always want the salad. You don’t always want to eat healthily. You know, you can’t, because your body is not craving that kind of thing. You want some kind of comfort food. You can also have healthy comfort food, you know. I bought mainly nutrition, I tried to eat salads. I tried to eat fresh food. I tried to eat organic meats as much as possible. I make soups. Kids try to eat healthy. They make salads and stuff like that, you know. So they learn as well through what you do. They learn that this is the right way to eat, and they help at school as well. School is wanting to promote healthy eating, so it’s got to be a way of life.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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