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Jo Taylor: The Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment

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Published on October 12, 2016

Cancer can affect your life in many different ways. Apart from the physical symptoms, cancer diagnosis and treatment comes with a psychological burden for patients, family members and close friends. In this video, Jo Taylor, a breast cancer survivor, talks about how she coped with the mental burden of her treatment. She refers to exercise as a way of getting over the problem, but also mentions other activities, such as engaging with the patient community and providing support to others going through the same journey as her.

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Transcript | Jo Taylor: The Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jo Taylor:

It’s a lot of impact with your husband, even your physical appearance is completed, you find it completely different, because of the loss of breasts or, you know, with the reconstruction. So that as well, that makes into a, you know, can be a problem for couples. And that side of it, and your children see different changes as well. 

Depression’s a big thing, and I think a lot of people get problems like that, sometimes not always recognized. Sometimes they are. And that’s why I do the exercise, because I want to help myself get over these problems without having to take another tablet. Because the last thing that you want to do if you’ve got, you know, tablets to take in the morning or the afternoon or evening is to take another one to cause more side effects. I like to do the exercise. It helps you in many ways not just physically, being able to lose weight, being able to keep fit but also mentally as well. The mental side of it is a massive thing. If you can get over that problem, you know, and deal with it in that kind of way, then it’s great, much better. 

 

We’re a very active family. When the children are at school, I’m usually doing something to do with the website and social media accounts that have to do with After Breast Cancer Diagnosis, which I set up three years ago. It’s helped me I think to cope with my disease, to be able to meet other patients, deal with other patients, be a peer support for other patients. I just find helping people like that, you know, because I find through my own treatment being a knowledgeable patient and having that power of knowledge to actually go to a professional and say, you know, I know about X, Y, Zed, or there’s a new treatment that’s come out, or I heard about this is very empowering for a patient. I could have come back to work if I wanted to, but you know I’ve got two young children. And so I didn’t want to go back to work, and then it would have to be childcare and problems related to that. So that’s why I decided to do the website, because I thought it would give me a purpose in all this and that I could give something back and help people as well. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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