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Rebecca Seago-Coyle: How Can I Manage Anxiety?

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Published on October 23, 2017

At the age of 35, Rebecca was diagnosed with breast cancer. Not knowing what the future holds is scary, but she shares tips on managing anxiety and how to live well during treatment. 

Recorded as part of the Patients 2.0 Session of the Health 2.0 Conference.

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Transcript |

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Rebecca Seago-Coyle:

I was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 35. A couple of tips that I have for people who have been diagnosed with breast cancer is one, remember to breathe. I know how anxious you can feel and how fearful it is not knowing what the future holds. But it sounds very cliche, but if you can take a deep breath, it really does help with the anxiety. I used this method while I was waiting for my doctors to come in, and by the time they came in to talk to me, I was much more calmer and able to communicate with them better. 

The second tip I have for you is remember you are the CEO of you. You are with you 24/7/365. And if you know what your body is like and how it responds to things, be aware of that and use that to communicate with your doctors. That will help them understand where you’re coming from and your goals.

And finally the third thing that I have is don’t forget to do the things that you love. Just because you might have been diagnosed with cancer doesn’t mean that life has to stop completely. When I was diagnosed I continued running, and that really helped me both mentally and physically get through the treatments, and it just made me focus on something a little bit more positive. Whether it be walking, knitting, playing with your kids or your grandkids, just remember to do something every day that you love.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.