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Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Patient’s Success Story

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Published on February 25, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • There is progress in treating triple-negative breast cancer, especially in clinical trials.
  • Ask your doctor if a clinical trial is right for you. It could make all the difference in your outcome.
  • If your doctor doesn’t discuss trials, consider a second opinion to understand your options.

Cindy Meurin of Austin, Texas was diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, one of the most difficult-to-treat subtypes. Fortunately, her doctor discussed a clinical trial with her and she enrolled. Cindy believes it saved her life, and there is currently no sign of the cancer.

Watch as Cindy and her daughter, Kaitlin, urge other women to consider participating in a clinical trial—and how thankful they are that Cindy’s doctor presented the option.

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Transcript | Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: A Patient’s Success Story

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:       
Hello. Andrew Schorr here at a conference in Austin, Texas, with two ladies from Austin; Cindy and Kaitlin Meurin. Cindy has been a triple-negative breast cancer patient in a clinical trial and now, no sign of disease.

Cindy Meurin:         
Correct. That's right.

 Andrew Schorr:       
And Kaitlin has gone to every doctor, radiation, chemo appointment, everything. So, first of all, you're doing well.

Cindy Meurin:         
Yes, I'm doing very well. All the cancer's gone, feeling great. The only thing I'm doing right now is a follow-up on an infusion that I do every six months that's supposed to help strengthen my bones to help keep the cancer from coming back.

Andrew Schorr:       
Okay. So, triple-negative breast cancer's a pretty terrifying diagnosis.

Cindy Meurin:         
It is. That is correct.

Andrew Schorr:       
And so, there has been research, thank God, going on for this. Are you glad you were in a clinical trial?

Cindy Meurin:         
Yes, I was glad. I was not really educated on clinical trials, but my oncologist referred me to one. And after I reviewed it, I thought, "Well, why shouldn't I try?" If it can help me and help other people, I wanted to do it.

Andrew Schorr:       
And it does help other people.

Cindy Meurin:         
It does, very much.

Andrew Schorr:       
And as you know, triple-negative has been really a natty problem in breast cancer.

Cindy Meurin:         
Yes, it has.

Andrew Schorr:       
So, how do you feel about the future now?

Cindy Meurin:         
Well, I'm really hopeful for the future and hoping it doesn't come back. But I feel that everything that I did was helpful to me and my body, and I’m looking forward to the future.

Andrew Schorr:       
And if it did come back, and the doctors said, "We're doing more research. There's another clinical trial." Would you consider it?

Cindy Meurin:         
Yes, I would definitely consider it.

Andrew Schorr:       
Okay. What would you say to the folks there about a discussion with a doctor about whether clinical trials might apply to them? What would you tell them?

Cindy Meurin:
Well, I didn't really know a whole lot about clinical trials, so I was glad I had an oncologist that informed me about it and gave me the opportunity to decide whether I wanted to be in a clinical trial or not. And education is the key, letting people know what's out there to help them besides your regular care and treatment that you get. So, definitely look into it. It's your decision at the end, but it's definitely worth it. And it helps other people as well as it can help yourself.

Andrew Schorr:       
Well, Cindy, thank you. Now, I should mention this is a family affair. So, here's Kaitlin. So, Kaitlin, you went to all the different appointments supporting your mom.

Kaitlin Meurin:        
Yes.

Andrew Schorr:       
What would you say to family members about supporting your loved one if they decide to be in a trial?

Kaitlin Meurin:        
I would definitely say to make sure you support them and go with them, because you're an extra eye and an extra ear. Sometimes it's scary for them, and they don't always take in that information when they're talking with the doctor. So, my sister and I would always take notes and compare notes. If she missed something, we would be like, "Okay, this is what she said. This is what's going to happen." It's just nice to be there for your family member and be a part of it.

Andrew Schorr:       
Well, thank you for supporting your mom, and both of you, in what has happened, supporting other women who may be dealing or face triple-negative breast cancer. We're so delighted you're doing well. And thank you for that plug for clinical trials, because triple-negative breast cancer has been difficult to say the least. And now, there's research that's starting to happen. It's benefitted her. The benefit for you, but you’ve got to ask about it. You’ve got to be proactive. Go that extra mile.

Cindy and Kaitlin, Andrew here in Austin wishing you all the best. And remember, knowledge can be the best medicine of all.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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