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Ask the Expert: Does CLL Affect Male Fertility?

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Published on December 12, 2017

How does CLL affect fertility in men? Can it reduce the quality of sperm? World-renowned CLL expert, Dr. Michael Keating from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, identifies fertility-related risk factors from the disease and its treatment, and shares his advice for helping to ensure a healthy pregnancy.

This Ask the Expert series is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power.   We thank AbbVie and Genentech for their support.

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Transcript | Ask the Expert: Does CLL Affect Male Fertility?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Andrew Schorr:

Hello, Andrew Schorr here with my doctor I’ve known for so many years, Dr. Michael Keating, as we post some of your questions and to get expert answers. Dr. Keating, thanks for being with us.

Dr. Keating:

It’s a pleasure, Andrew, as usual.

Andrew Schorr:

So this probably from a man who’s a little bit younger. If a male is diagnosed with very early stage CLL, does it have any impact on complicating a pregnancy? Similarly, does early stage CLL in males impact the fertility or quality of their sperm? 

Dr. Keating:         

I don’t think there’s been any study of the quality of sperm in younger individuals. There is certainly recommendation that if people are considering having children after they’re diagnosed that they be sperm banking as a part of their disease management, and it should be done certainly before they have any treatment, because you don’t want any potential DNA-damaging agents to be given to people.

Many people have had children after they’ve had various forms of treatment for leukemia and breast cancer, et cetera, without any significant increase in abnormalities in the fetus and the child. But erring on the safety, just get your sperm banked away for a rainy day. 

Andrew Schorr:

Dr. Michael Keating, thanks as always for answering questions from our community, thank you for your dedication. If you have a question for Dr. Keating or other experts, send them to CLL@patientpower.info. With Dr. Michael Keating from MD Anderson, I’m Andrew Schorr. Remember, knowledge can be the medicine of all.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

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