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How Can CLL Patients Benefit from IVIG?

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Published on November 27, 2019

Key Takeaways

  • Immunoglobulins are antibodies that help CLL patients fight infections.
  • Understanding the process of getting healthy antibodies from donors.
  • Discuss with your doctor if IVIG infusions are right for you. 

What is IVIG and how can it benefit chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients? During this Ask the Expert segment, Dr. Susan Leclair explains what immunoglobulins are, why they’re important for immune health and the process of getting the IVIG infusion. Watch as Dr. Leclair discusses why the IVIG infusion is helpful for some CLL patients when it comes to fighting infections.  

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank AbbVie, Inc. and Pharmacyclics for their support. These organizations have no editorial control.

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Transcript |

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:          

Susan, so, we mentioned this a couple of times, IVIG. And some of our patients who are on this program get it, too. So, what is immunoglobulin, or what are Igs? What is this stuff?

Dr. Leclair:                  

Immunoglobulins are essentially proteins. They can be transport proteins. You eat a steak, your body absorbs the iron, and it needs to get put on a transporter, so that it can be moved around. So, there’s transport proteins. There are modifying proteins that control how fast or how slow something’s gonna happen.

But the ones you are interested are the immunoglobulins that are antibodies. Now we all know about antibodies because there’s certainly been enough argument across this country in the last few years about antibodies in terms of getting immunizations for children against measles and mumps and other childhood disorders, whether or not it’s Zika, and all the rest.

You have in you, over time, built up a body of antibodies, a collection, an encyclopedia of antibodies that remember that you had that disease 22 years ago. And while you're not actually making a whole lot of those antibodies, you're making enough of those antibodies to make sure you’re never gonna get it again.

What happens with CLL folks is that they don’t make either functional antibodies, or they don't make enough, which means that you at your age might have had an immunization for mumps a long time ago. My guess is you don't want to have mumps right now. So, we should give you some pre-informed, pre-manufactured antibodies against mumps that will help whatever cells that are in your body that are trying to make mumps antibody to give you enough mumps antibodies so that you never get mumps again.

So, this a procedure that is giving you this infusion of antibodies, is to keep your system at a place where it won’t get sick when you're in a subway and someone sneezes, when you're in a restaurant and someone coughs at you, when you find yourself somewhere with a friend who says, “Gee, I hope you don't mind, but I'm still getting over X.” So, it’s protective for you.

Andrew Schorr:          

Okay. And Dr. Kipps here in San Diego says, “Andrew, if you want to travel,” and that’s true, and I like to travel, and we’ve seen many of our CLL friends when we do, he said, “You gotta have the IVIG infusions.”

Justin, just so we understand, what about—she mentioned immunizations. First of all, where does immunoglobulin come from? My understanding is it's made from somebody else's blood. I’m getting like a blood product, hopefully, squeaky clean in that, and I'm getting some immune benefit from that. Is that the idea?

Dr. Taylor:                  

Yeah, that’s correct. So, the antibodies come from B cells, and that’s why CLL is a disease of the B cells. And so, that's why they’re, as Susan mentioned, they’re not forming the proper antibodies. So, we can get these healthy antibodies from donors, and it's usually a pool of those antibodies to get enough to give you that boost.

And I just wanted to mention that not every patient with CLL needs these. You can measure the immunoglobulin levels in the body, and if they’re normal, you may not need the extra boost, especially if you’re early CLL and watching and waiting. And, again, and if patients are getting recurrent infections, that’s another reason that they might need transfusion.

Andrew Schorr:          

Right. Yeah, and I’ll mention, to be clear in my case. So, I went 17-year remission, folks. I did get some sinus infections. Usually, if I got a cold I got sinus infections, took antibiotics, quicker than people who don't have CLL, of course, and it knocked it out, okay.

What we noticed is, after I had retreatment for CLL with a monoclonal antibody, obinutuzumab or Gazyva, with steroids in my case, about almost two years ago I was getting more often infections. The CLL was controlled, but, like Susan just said, my immune system was inept and it needed some help. And so, Dr. Kipps decided I needed IVIG. But that's a personal thing with you and your doctor. You may be monitoring how frequently, just what Justin just said, how often you're getting infections because it’s certainly not for everybody.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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