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Resistance to Treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

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Published on February 7, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • Resistance can be an issue in treating CLL, but new therapies offer hope and additional treatment options.

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia expert Dr. Alessandra Ferrajoli, from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, talks about the issue of resistance in treating CLL. Dr. Ferrajoli explains which new therapies—and new combinations of existing therapies—are showing promise, especially when resistance is detected and addressed early. Watch now to learn more from a CLL expert.

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Transcript | Resistance to Treatment for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:         

So, I know it may be different for people on their first treatment, but some people have been on treatment before, or are on treatment, and they need something else. This issue of resistance comes up. So, we’ve had some newer CLL medicines now, for a few years, and we have others coming. Can we now continue to stay ahead of the CLL, and have resistance not be an issue?

 

 

Dr. Ferrajoli:              

Yes. It’s a challenge, but I think we can. First of all, the new class of medicine, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and the Bcl-2 antagonist, and they work through different mechanism. So, even if the resistance can develop, and often develops in the patient that have had more therapies, and in patient that have the so-called unfavorable prognostic factors such as mutation of TP53. If the resistance is developed toward one of the two main group of agent, it, you can obtain responses when there are other therapies.

Also, we can now add chemotherapy to some of the targeted therapy to further deepen the responses, and we are also entering the era of newer options in terms of cellular therapies. For example, some of the data presented at ASH on CAR-T cell in CLL were quite interesting and positive, and so the challenge and the strategy is to try to anticipate the development of the resistance or detect the development of the resistance early, so that the therapy can be more defined, and a new agent can be brought into the treatment strategy.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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