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What Is IVIG?

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Published on September 29, 2015

What is IVIG? Dr. Javier Munoz, a CLL expert from Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center, addresses intravenous immunoglobulins, also known as IVIG, which is a treatment approach used to prevent infections in CLL patients.  

Sponsored by the Patient Empowerment Network, which received educational grants from AbbVie and Genentech. 

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What a wonderful time we had! We were excited like fans at a rock concert, but our rock stars were the medical experts.

— Lynn, CLL town meeting attendee

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Transcript | What Is IVIG?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Susan Leclair:

I’ve heard two schools of thought about this, and they’re entirely different. I wondered what you thought about IVIG therapy. 

Andrew Schorr:                  

Okay. And somebody better define IVIG for us. Do you want to do that?

Dr. Munoz:          

Sure.  Immunoglobulins are proteins that will help us fight infections. 

And we all have immunoglobulins with or without CLL.  In the case of CLL, that factory, that production of immunoglobulins, is somehow impaired. So the numbers can be reduced.  Now, you’re correct.  There are different philosophies when it comes to IVIG.  There are some providers out there that prescribe IVIG more frequently than others. Myself, I prefer not to prescribe it as commonly and prescribe it only when it’s needed. That would be when the patient is having severe recurrent infections that require intravenous antibiotics and/or hospitalizations.  Short of that, I try not to use intravenous immunoglobulins.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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