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Where Is Research Today on CLL Vaccines?

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Published on March 27, 2019

Patient Power community member Beth wants to know if any progress is being made on vaccines for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). During this Ask the Expert segment, CLL expert Dr. Richard Furman, from Weill Cornell Medicine, responds by giving an update on where research is today with CLL vaccines and provides insight to what clinical studies are focusing on to help improve the design and efficacy. Watch now to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank AbbVie, Inc. and Pharmacyclics for their support.

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Transcript | Where Is Research Today on CLL Vaccines?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So Beth with wrote in and wanted to know is there work going on on a CLL vaccine? 

Right now, a lot of our current research is focused on not so much the target that the vaccine should be against but ways to make the vaccine more effective.  Things like using PD-1 inhibitors, which can actually make the tumors more apparent to the immune system.  Or using things that can actually enhance the presentation of the actual vaccine to the immune system, and that includes everything from idelalisib (Zydelig) and ibrutinib (Imbruvica) to other different molecules that may actually make it more readily apparent. 

Now, we do also have some new targets like ROR1, which may prove to be very exciting and interesting, but this is still all very far away from anything that will be approvable.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.