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CAR T-Cell Therapy: An Expert Weighs the Risks and Benefits

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Published on June 11, 2018

CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as an exciting immunotherapy yielding promising results in some areas of cancer care. Could it be an option for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients? On location at CLL Live in Niagara Falls, Canada, CLL expert Dr. Nicole Lamanna, from Columbia University Medical Center, gives an expert perspective from clinical trial evidence on the current and future status of CAR T-cell therapy for CLL. Dr. Lamanna discusses who it’s approved for, potential toxicities, and what’s critically needed to improve the success of the novel therapeutic approach. Watch now to learn more.

 

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Transcript | CAR T-Cell Therapy: An Expert Weighs the Risks and Benefits

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:         

There are, yes.  Yes.  And there are toxicities with CAR-T cells.  But I think the more—the more that we're using this in general, just like anything else there's a learning curve, and so certainly as we get better dealing with potential toxicities in CAR T-cell therapy and know how to handle them better it will go smoother.  So that's I think requires just a little bit of a learning curve. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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