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How Do Vitamins Interact With CLL Treatment?

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Published on September 4, 2018

Are vitamins beneficial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients? CLL expert Dr. Michael Keating, from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, shares what kind of vitamins are recommended, how certain vitamins may impact a person’s CLL and explains the best way for patients to maintain optimal nutrition. Watch now to find out more.

Provided by CLL Global Research Foundation, which received support from AbbVie Inc., Gilead Sciences, Inc., Pharmacyclics LLC and TG Therapeutics. It is produced by Patient Power in collaboration with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Transcript | How Do Vitamins Interact With CLL Treatment?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jeff Folloder:

The question was given to me specifically for you, Dr. Keating.

Dr. Lamanna:              

Oh, that’s good.

Jeff Folloder:               

Is it worth taking vitamins? 

Dr. Keating:                 

Most people who eat a balanced diet, in the United States get plenty of vitamins, and most vitamins that are taken daily…

…end up in the urinal, they just go through… 

Dr. Ferrajoli:              

…deletion.

Dr. Keating:                 

There’s no harm in taking a multivitamin, but megavitamins are not a good strategy. I had a lady who was helping her husband by juicing. And, she was juicing carrots, and carrots have got a lot of vitamin A in them. And, he came back to see me in the clinic, and he was the original Orange Man. Everything was orange, and his white count had gone from 20,000 to 86,000. His spleen had gone form 3 centimeters down to 8 centimeters, and when we stopped it, everything went back to normal. So that there’s a small subset that have receptors for vitamin A, and it’s not a good thing. 

There are a whole bunch of unknown things, that we have no way to measure. And so, a balanced diet. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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