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Patient Demographics for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Understanding Disease Development in Different Age Groups

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Published on April 10, 2019

What age groups does Hodgkin lymphoma typically affect? Do disease characteristics differ among younger and older patient populations? On-site in San Diego at the 2018 American Society of Hematology (ASH) annual meeting, leading Hodgkin lymphoma experts Dr. Joshua Brody and Dr. Andrew Evens joined Patient Power to help others better understand patient demographics for Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Watch now to learn more.

We thank Seattle Genetics for their support.

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Transcript | Patient Demographics for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Understanding Disease Development in Different Age Groups

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:           

So, Esther, we have a daughter—25—and that’s one of the age groups right in it, and then, your parents are older.

Esther Schorr: 

Right. So, our understanding of Hodgkin lymphoma—you’ve got a sort of bifurcated group.

Dr. Brody:       

Yes, it is that type of camel, not the dromedary, but the other type of camel. It starts with a “B.”

Esther Schorr: 

No, no, the other one that has two places to store water.

Andrew Schorr:           

What are the age groups where this is, and do we know why?

Dr. Evens:       

That’s a good question. No, I don’t think we do. There are some theories, of course, but yeah, the term we use is “bimodal.” So, you see two peaks, I guess you could say, like a camel’s hump. The first is in your mid-20s to early-30s, and then it doesn’t go away, but becomes less common, and then it’s really in the 70s. Some people used to say 60s, but really 70s and early 80s that you see a second peak. Relatively speaking, it’s the same, but of course, absolute numbers—there’s more 25-year-olds than 75-year-olds. With that said, but probably 20-25 percent in the population of Hodgkin lymphoma are in that older age group.

Esther Schorr: 

Are the symptoms different in those two groups, or do they present the same way?

Dr. Evens:       

More similar than not. The only maybe difference in the older patients is they’re more likely to have advanced-stage disease, so it’s more two thirds of those patients will have—for older patients, advanced-stage. Younger patients, it’s more 50-50, early-stage advanced, maybe even a bit more early-stage, meaning just on one side of the diaphragm. Often, it’s above the diaphragm, just as Josh said, maybe in the neck, a couple areas there.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.