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Let's Talk Metastatic Breast Cancer: Living with MBC

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Published on September 30, 2020

Metastatic Breast Cancer Patient Stories

How is metastatic breast cancer diagnosed? What treatments are metastatic survivors taking? Four women living with metastatic breast cancer have a roundtable discussion on the issues metastatic survivors face, including hair loss from chemotherapy, how their relationships with their spouses and children have deepened, taking supplements with doctor's recommendations and advice for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer.

Watch as host and twenty-year metastatic breast cancer patient Sandi Spivey talks to patient advocates, Rochelle Consignado, Jennifer George and Brittany Shook dive deep into these issues.

This series is sponsored by Seattle Genetics. This organization has no editorial control. It is produced by Patient Power, and Patient Power is solely responsible for program content.

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Transcript | Let's Talk Metastatic Breast Cancer: Living with MBC

Challenges of Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Sandi Spivey: 

Hi. Thank you for joining us today. I'm Sandi Spivey. Welcome to Episode five of Patient Power's Let's Talk About Metastatic Breast Cancer series, sponsored by Seattle Genetics. In our last program, we talked about treatment options for those living with metastatic breast cancer. If you missed it live, you can watch the replay on patientpower.info. Today we're going to talk about the challenges of living with metastatic breast cancer.  

I'm really excited to be moderating today's discussion. I was diagnosed with MBC in 1998 at the age of 45, three years after my early-stage diagnosis. I've had over 15 kinds of therapies. And it seems like with every therapy, there's different challenges and side effects. Why don't we go around the horn and say, what kinds of treatments have you been on? And how long have you been living with metastatic breast cancer? So, Brittany, what kind of treatments have you been on? How long have you been living with metastatic breast cancer? 

Treatments for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Brittany Shook: 

A year, so that's good. It's September 15th, so diagnosed last August. I have been on hormone suppressants, so letrozole (Femara). I was on Xgeva (denosumab) to put the calcium back into my bones. I started off, I think, with Zometa (zoledronic acid), but from previous chemotherapy and then also getting my lymph nodes removed on my left side back when I had stage 3, I can only use my right side, but my veins are shot, so now I get the shot. I was taking Lupron (leuprorelin), but Lupron is on backorder, so I just started Zoladex (goserelin) last month. I get that every 28 days. I take Kisqali (ribociclib) for aromatase inhibitor. I take that for 28 days, and then I'm off a week. Let's see. That's pretty much it.  

Before when I first got started, I was on a lot of pain pills, but I've since stopped all pain pills. I just take the medication to kill the cancer cells, and put calcium back in my bones, and preserve my ovaries. Most recently, I have low iron. Last week and the week before last, I had to get iron infusions, so hopefully, I'm good on those for another six months. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Wow. You've been through a lot in a year, but it sounds like you've made some really good progress. The progress is good. Being able to not rely on pain pills can be good. When you need them, you need them, right? 

Brittany Shook: 

Right, right. 

Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

Sandi Spivey: 

That's important. Rochelle, how long have you been living with metastatic breast cancer? What kind of treatments have you had? 

Rochelle Consignado: 

Four years, since May 2016. I've been on Taxol (paclitaxel), carboplatin (Paraplatin), Herceptin (trastuzumab), and Perjeta (pertuzumab), commonly abbreviate, TCHP, because I'm HER2-positive off the charts, off the charts. Then I was on Tykerb (lapatinib), and Xeloda (Capecitabine), Kadcyla (trastuzumab emtansine). Right now, I just started Enhertu (fam-trastuzumab deruxtecan) last month. It's making my hair fall out. That's why this is... 

Sandi Spivey: 

Oh. 

Rochelle Consignado: 

I've been on, I don't know how many. I haven't counted, but it's been four years. I've been on all those drugs. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Wow, wow. 

Rochelle Consignado: 

My phone even can spell them now. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Okay. How about you, Jennifer? How long with MBC? What have you been on? 

Jennifer George: 

Five years for MBC in October. I've been on five different therapies, starting out with Ibrance (palbociclib) because I was hormone positive. That lasted two years Two and three-quarters, so it was almost three years. Then my cancer mutated to triple negative, so then we started another whole route. I think I did Xeloda, Taxotere (Docetaxel), Abraxane. I'm on the new Trodelvy (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) right now.  

Sandi Spivey: 

As far as my over 15 lines of therapy, I have a chart on my blog. My blog is cats, and the letter N, and cancer, with no spaces: catsncancer.com. I've listed everything out because it's just way too much to talk about. I would take up all the time here, and I don't want to do that. 

How Rochelle Discovered She Had Metastatic Breast Cancer

Rochelle Consignado: 

I was born and raised in Illinois. What it looked and felt like was, four to five years ago, it felt like I had a cold and a cough that just lasted weeks. I was easily winded. I couldn't climb stairs. I had to use an inhaler. Then my right breast had a lump. It was in the same place where I had clogged milk ducts when I was nursing my firstborn, but that quickly turned to rock solid, the whole breast was rock hard. They finally diagnosed me with metastatic breast cancer from the beginning because it had traveled to my bones, and it was in my lungs. That's why I couldn't climb stairs. 

From chemo, I have leftover numbness in my toes and in my fingertips. My feet used to feel like cement, but it healed up. I still have either residual effects or permanent nerve damage. Thankfully, it's not the painful neuropathy, but the numb neuropathy. I find that emotional challenges can be as daunting as the physical ones. I was a mess. I had a hard time coping at the beginning. Cried a lot. I couldn't enjoy things. I couldn't watch a movie. My mind would wander, and I'd think about, "Oh, I'm going to die. I'm going to die. I'm going die." Gradually, I had a lot of help from my family, from my friends, from therapists. My mind was able to kind of compartmentalize the cancer into a box so that I could put it away, and enjoy things, get things done. I encouraged- 

My kids are very young. They're five and seven years old. At the time when I was diagnosed, they were three years old and something like 16 months. I was so depressed, but I forced myself out of bed, so they wouldn't worry. It's not, I have to make breakfast for them while I have cancer. It's like I get to make breakfast for them. I'm strong enough to make breakfast for them. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Yes, that makes a huge difference, to make that mental leap. That can be difficult.  

Side Effects of Stage 4 Breast Cancer Treatment

Jennifer, you've faced some quality-of-life issues that would have impacted your relationship with your husband, but you were able to overcome those. Would you share your experience with that and overall, how it's been like for you living with metastatic breast cancer? 

Jennifer George: 

Definitely, yes. I feel like I went right into the fire with this. Eight months after we were married, I had a pain in my right hip. That ended up being metastatic breast cancer. Immediately, I had radiation. Then one of my vertebrae collapsed, so I had spinal fusion. I went right onto hormone therapy treatment. I went onto Ibrance. I mean, it was just a huge whirlwind of all types of treatments and all types of things. I had just gotten married, so you can imagine that this was not really easy. We were just getting used to each other at that point. 

There were some things that I just feel really lucky that I kind of grabbed onto in the very, very beginning. One of the treatments caused me to have, what's called, toxic... I guess we'd call neurology. It's where your brain just doesn't operate right. On me, I just thought he was the worst person in the world. I mean, I say I was like Cruella de Vil. I could do anything to just get him out of my life and get away from me. 

How Breast Cancer Deepened Our Bond As A Couple

Once I kind of came through that, and talked with some therapists, and actually took me off of that treatment, it became even more important that I keep up the different things that bonded us together as a couple. I wanted to share some of those things. From the get-go, one of the things we chose to do was to really have fun with each other. Sounds kind of silly, but it really makes a difference if you tell jokes. We would even joke about the cancer.  

When people would say maybe ridiculous things to me, like, "Well, hey, here. You can cure it with my magic beans," we would just, all week, go, "Hey, there's your magic beans. Here's your magic beans," something to just lighten the load a bit. 

The other thing we did is, I decided that since we got married, and this happened so quickly after we got married, we never got to enjoy being newlyweds. Well, I decided, why don't we go to dinner once a month on the anniversary of the date that we got married, the 14th, and just celebrate each other? We actually give each other some funky little gift, or a little card, or something like that. We go to the restaurant we met in on our online date. Thank goodness, it's an inexpensive restaurant, so we can go every month. 

That has been really wonderful because people follow us. They talk about it. They'd even given us gift cards to the restaurant. It's something you can look forward to. You know you're going to do together, and you're going to spend that time together.  

It's really important that I give words of praise to the caretaker. We have no idea what it's like to be that caretaker. That's a really crazy, difficult place to be in. I don't care what my husband does. He hands me a glass of water. "Thank you so much, Honey." I mean, every single time, there's a thank-you coming from my mouth. There's praise all the time which, no matter what's going on, what chaos, whatever, how stressful it is, even if I don't think in that moment, I make sure later on in the day, I go, "You know what? Thank for doing all that. Thank you right now for putting the dogs locked away in the room so I can talk to everybody today." 

It's very, very important that we share that with our caretakers. In turn, he's done some special things that I wanted to share this. I didn't last time. He makes me breakfast in bed every morning. He brings it up on a little tray. That way, I can wake up slowly and give my body a chance to get to where I am in a good mood. I'm not so cranky. These things work off of each other. We both work towards us having a better quality of life. I think the more you can do that, the more you can manage through this journey. 

Cancer Stages: Moving From Stage 3 to Stage 4 Breast Cancer

Sandi Spivey: 

Then finally, Brittany Shook... Brittany, you have an interesting story to talk about, not only living with metastatic breast cancer, but actually being diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Will you tell us a little bit about that? 

Brittany Shook: 

Yes, it had seemed that breast cancer hits me in August. Originally, I was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer in August, around the 24th or 25th of 2015. Then last year, August 25th or 26th, 2019, I was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer after, in July, the end of July, having a clean bill of health. About two weeks later, from going to my oncologist, I noticed I had severe stomach pain that wasn't relieved with over-the-counter medicine and extreme pain in my tailbone. I remember in my oncology office in July, my blood came out really slow. Everyone was like, "Oh, sometimes that happens." 

Come to find out, once I got all my scans, it was a week of scans that it had spread everywhere: my skull, my skull base, my spine, liver, kidney, certain spots on my lungs, ribs. I had a fracture in my right hip that I didn't know about, my tailbone, just everywhere. It went from literally me, in July... I was in Vegas, Fourth of July weekend, to August, I can't sleep. I can't walk. Just a mental mess because I didn't understand how within less than four weeks, my body was riddled with cancer, debilitating cancer. 

Sandi Spivey: 

So, it felt like you went overnight, from a stage 3 to metastatic breast cancer. 

Brittany Shook: 

Exactly. For a little over two years, it's like, "Oh, you're cancer free." I was celebrating being cancer free. It was like, oh, cancer free. Stage 3 to cancer free, living like a survivor, and then, oh, no, you're not a survivor anymore. Yes, it was overnight. 

Hair Loss From Chemotherapy

Sandi Spivey: 

I know losing your hair becomes kind of a standard practice with some people going through metastatic breast cancer. I know I've lost my hair five times. That's why I keep it short. It's no use growing it. Do you see that? Have you had hair, and then the hair is gone from the kind of treatment you're on? Then you have hair again, then treatment. Rochelle, how has that been for you? 

Rochelle Consignado: 

Well, it's not easy, but I kind of like the fact of not having to fix things. You got to find the fun in it. For instance, I have head scarves that match the colors that tend to be in my wardrobe. I've lost my hair five times over the last four years. One shaved... I mean, it's falling out right now. That's why I'm wearing this. That's one way I cope with it. When it falls off, my scalp tended to ache. I found a bottle of aloe vera chilled in the fridge and rubbed on the scalp was so heavenly. Yes, it helped with the scalp soreness when the hair starts to fall out. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Yes, that's something I wasn't used to, is the soreness of your scalp, because I just wanted my hair off. I had it shaved because it was like, no, this feels terrible. Jennifer, how about you? How do you cope with hair loss? 

Jennifer George: 

You know what? Basically, my husband and I say that I have joined the naked mole rat club because I have no eyelashes, no body hair, nothing. I look like a naked mole rat. I'm almost thinking of maybe starting a club for women who want to be part of it for us that don't have any hair because you know what? You have to have fun with it. In fact, today as I got ready, he said, "Don't wear your cap." I'm like, "Eh. I can't scare them that bad, all right?" 

I have to say there are some benefits not having to do my hair. It's a huge benefit. I now get ready... When we have to go to chemo, I just tell my husband, "I need 25 minutes, and that's it, to take a shower, put on a little eyeliner, get dressed, put on my cap, and get in the car." It would be an hour and a half before. You know what? There are some benefits. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Yes, yes. I know some people get some pretty fancy wigs, too, and have fun with those as well.  

How Can You Trust Your Oncologist?

Sandi Spivey: 

Brittany, with your experience with your oncologist, how do you trust your oncologist knowing that it seems like you went from no problems to huge problems when it comes to metastatic breast cancer? 

Brittany Shook: 

Good question. The fact that I have to help her look good, that’s what makes me trust her because the more I survive, and the more I live, and I do well, it makes her look good as a doctor. In that way, we need each other. That's how I trust her. When I have symptoms, I have to trust myself more to be able to say, "Hey, I'm experiencing these," just because we only see each other once a month. Before, it was every six months. She has so much other things going on. I know for sure she just not like, "Let me spend all this time on Brittany." 

Trusting her, I have to trust myself more. We have developed a right relationship where I say things to her because once I got my mental right last year, I asked for a FoundationOne test. No one said, "Hey, this is something that you should do," or, "We'll give it to you." I asked for it. It's like me asking and she asks me. I guess that's how I trust her, and she trusts me. She knows I'm going to come in with questions written down. That's kind of our relationship now. 

Sandi Spivey: 

I think that's one of the things that was surprising to people living with metastatic breast cancer, is that the characteristic of your cancer can change over time. You may be on an anti-HER2 drug, Herceptin or something, for a very long time. It stops working, and the reason why it stops working is because it's become resistant to HER2 drugs. If you give another HER2 drug, it just seems strange that you would give something when something doesn't work. 

Brittany Shook: 

Right. 

Sandi Spivey: 

That's what doctors have been doing for a long time, but now, there's more and more people who are actually doing a second biopsy or a blood-based biopsy to make sure that the characteristics of the cancer hasn't changed because you might be eligible for certain drugs that you were not eligible before due to your cancer's characteristics. 

Brittany Shook: 

Right. 

Immunotherapy for Metastasized Breast Cancer

Sandi Spivey: 

Are any of you on immunotherapy? Jennifer, have you been on... Nobody? 

Jennifer George: 

We tried it. We tried it, but I had a reaction, so we might circle back again one day. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Was yours a rash type problem, or what was it? 

Jennifer George: 

No. We don't know if it's immunotherapy or if I was exposed outside of that during the time I first had my infusion when you're immune system was very low. We can't sort out. I was exposed to meningitis, unfortunately, by a caretaker. Were the symptoms from the immunotherapy or were they from the caretaker? At this point, since other drugs are working, they're going to hold off on immunotherapy because I had a very severe reaction to it. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Well, that's one of the things, too, is that I always suggest that people have a plan B, that they know what they're on now but know what their doctor is thinking about for the next level of treatment because, to me, that always felt good that I knew what is coming up, and that there is something available for me, and that we do have a plan. Have you asked your doctors similar things? How about you, Rochelle? Do you have a plan B? 

Treatment Plan for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Rochelle Consignado: 

Well, actually, my doctor... Even before I ask, she says, "Oh, there are some things that we can try if this doesn't work." I like that she's already thinking ahead, or as I call it, she's already thinking of the other bullets in the gun that she chooses. 

Sandi Spivey: 

How about you, Brittany? Do you know what you'd go on next if this stops working? 

Brittany Shook: 

I do not. I got a second opinion out-of-state. That oncologist gave me a list of things, but my oncologist didn't. Her goal is to keep me on what I'm on now for as long as possible. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Right. 

Brittany Shook: 

I will ask her that next time. I see her at the end of the month. Thank you. 

Sandi Spivey: 

How about you, Jennifer? Do you know what plan B is for you? 

Jennifer George: 

I did the same thing as Brittany. I went to get a second opinion at a research hospital. My next... It's going to be clinical trial. I know the next one, and I do know the clinical trial, but I only was able to get that by going for a second opinion. I can't emphasize that enough for us that are with MBC, to go ahead and do it, and go talk to other specialists, and find out what they have to say. It makes a big difference. Now I know exactly. That's not a gray area for me.  

Sandi Spivey: 

Now, more and more people are doing these second opinions over the phone, so you don't have to fly out to Houston, or Boston, or New York, or wherever. 

Jennifer George: 

Right. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Or even drive to Los Angeles, with us in Southern California, which is a huge drive. It's nice to be able to get those second opinions that way. Doctors are pretty willing to do those. One last question for you: What advice would you give a newly-diagnosed metastatic breast cancer patient? How about you, Brittany? What advice would you give to someone who was new to this? 

Breast Cancer Advice

Brittany Shook: 

Just be okay with your feelings. You're going to be sad. It's an emotional roller coaster, but try not to stay on it. I found local support groups. I have friends that are in different stages of breast cancer. We talk multiple times weekly. Kind of finding my tribe outside of my regular friends and family members because they try to offer support, but they really don't know or understand what I'm going through. I joined Facebook groups, but I learned to stay off of a lot of Facebook groups just because it's a lot of opinions about not necessarily good things. I try to stay as positive as possible and find stories of metastatic breast cancer patients who live longer than five years. 

For me, it's all about your mindset. If I can think, "Oh, I'm going to die next year, or I can die in 30 years," I'm choosing to think that I'm going to die in 30 years. I affirm daily that I'm a medical miracle, and my mantra is, "Wake up, kick butt, repeat." However that may be for me, that day- 

Sandi Spivey: 

What was that again? What was that again, Brittany? 

Brittany Shook: 

Wake up, kick butt, repeat. Maybe I'm not going to run a marathon today, but if, yesterday, I was in bed all day, the next day, I'm like, "Get up, and maybe go sit on the porch, and just get some fresh sunshine." That is my advice for a newly-diagnosed patient. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Thank you. How about you, Rochelle? What advice would you give to someone newly diagnosed? 

Rochelle Consignado: 

Two things... One is, your body can't fight if your mind can't fight. 

Brittany Shook: 

Right. 

Rochelle Consignado: 

If you need help, please seek it. If you can't sleep, therapists... My hospital system has therapists to help cancer patients. Also, the cancer community is not a club you like, that you want to get into, but I was glad that they were there for me. Whether they're friends, families, healthcare workers, friends, friends who were survivors, please know that there are a lot of people in your corner rooting for you and willing to help. 

Sandi Spivey: 

That's great. Thank you. How about you, Jennifer? What advice would you give to newly-diagnosed? 

Jennifer George: 

Immediately, I never, ever saw this as an end, an end of my life or end of anything. When I saw this from the very beginning, it was a new journey. I just had to go out there and look. What is going to happen in this new journey? What things can I look forward to? What things can I plan? How am I going to navigate this new journey? See it in that way. Just see it, you're taking a different road in life. Sometimes you might have to step back and see where the blessings are in there because we can get kind of caught up in all of the negativity. Sometimes I have to just literally stop and say, "Hey, you know what? I get to spend tons of time with Honey Bear." If I had not had breast cancer, I wouldn't have been able to do that. There are benefits, and we need to look at those, also. We need to look at those special things. 

Alternative Breast Cancer Treatments

Sandi Spivey: 

Metastatic breast cancer is often so scary that people go searching for alternative treatments. Did anyone do this? Brittany, did you look for anything alternative, meaning outside of your oncology? 

Brittany Shook: 

I did, yes. 

Sandi Spivey: 

What was that? 

Brittany Shook: 

I looked up a place in Mexico. I actually met two other women that went there. They shared some of the things that they were given. I started reading different books, and I had to relearn what I initially thought about breast cancer. Instead of thinking preventing breast cancer, I'm like, "I already have it, so what are things that maybe I can put in my body that kills the breast cancer cells?" I'm not preventing it because I have it.  

It mainly has just been vitamins and different supplements to build up my immune system. My medication wiped out my immune system. However, my blood work showed that I may be .3 to .4 away from having normal a white blood cell count. It was just different things like that. Meditation... Just different things like that. Supplements, and meditation, exercise, things of that nature. I couldn't go to Mexico. It was too expensive. Luckily, I met two people that went. They shared things with me, so I incorporated some of those things in my life. 

Sandi Spivey: 

How about you, Rochelle? Did you look into any alternative treatments? 

Rochelle Consignado: 

I talked to a couple dieticians. One thing that stuck out with me is... She said, "Eat more vegetables," because if you throw up on vegetables, you will not be hungry enough for the chocolate croissants that I like. She says, "Everybody should eat more vegetables in general anyway." That's all I remember that she told me. 

Sandi Spivey: 

All right. Jennifer, how about you? 

Jennifer George: 

I come from a medical background, so I am already biased, so probably not a good person to talk about alternative. However, some things, if they would pique my interest, I would go onto Google Scholar and see if I could find any research done on that particular alternative treatment to see if it was successful or not. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Right. 

Jennifer George: 

Definitely doing research, finding out if they actually even work because it's a lot of your time and energy for some of these alternative things. I don't have a lot of energy. 

Brittany Shook: 

I did know I stopped taking my vitamin C as I should and chaga mushroom. The powder... I just put in my coffee. It helps with your immune system. I did notice when I became lax on it here and there, my white blood cell count lowered.  

Sandi Spivey: 

That was chaga mushroom? 

Brittany Shook: 

Chaga, yes. Chaga. 

Sandi Spivey: 

Chaga. 

Brittany Shook: 

C-H-A-G-A. I take liposomal vitamin C. Mainly those things... I noticed a difference. Other than that, to be honest, I don't know. 

Sandi Spivey: 

One of the things that we just need to be careful of is if we are taking supplements or various things, that we need to check them out with our doctors because there are some supplements that will prevent your treatment from being as effective as it could be. 

Brittany Shook: 

Right. 

Sandi Spivey: 

It can end up with side effects. I think anytime you put anything in your body that you're going to be doing every day, it's a good idea to check it out with your doctor. 

Brittany Shook: 

I think there's also a website. I can't remember what medical facility has a website where you could check supplements and their interference or non-interference with certain drugs. Like Jennifer said, researching. It's mainly researching. I don't want to put anything in my body that's going to not make my medication work. Sometimes on my off week, I would maybe take more antioxidants because I'm off of my medication.  

Words of Encouragement For Breast Cancer 

Sandi Spivey: 

All right. As we wrap up, I'd like to invite each of our guests to share one last message of hope for our audience. Rochelle, let's start with you. 

Rochelle Consignado: 

The researchers are inventing things all the time. They're working right now to invent new medicines, new treatments for us.  

Sandi Spivey: 

That's a good thing to know. When I first started with metastatic breast cancer, there were only six therapies available. Now there's nearly 100 therapies available.  

Rochelle Consignado: 

Wow. 

Sandi Spivey: 

It's changed quite a bit. How about you, Brittany? What last words of encouragement do you have for our listeners? 

Brittany Shook: 

I say, live life. Like I said, last year, August to September until maybe mid-October, I felt bad, and I just had to boost myself up. I love to travel. By December, I had prepped myself back up to travel. I was in Italy. Now, maybe not so much because of COVID. I just started back doing the things that I love. If I felt like doing it, I'm like, "I'm doing it." I got my real estate license. I'm like, "As long as I'm physically able and I feel like doing it, I'm going to do it." Also, when I want to take a mental health day, I'll do that as well. I'm just like, live your life. 

Sandi Spivey: 

That's great. Thank you, Brittany. How about Jennifer? What are your words? 

Jennifer George: 

I'm just going to go off of what Brittany said, is this is your life. You're in charge. You're the captain of your ship. Now you get to live it any way you want. If you want to lay in bed all day, you can lay in bed all day. One of the things I didn't talk about is both me and Honey Bear, both had these dreams of hobbies we wanted to do our whole life, but you never can do. Basically, that's all we do every day. We get up. We have breakfast, mine in bed. Then I go paint, and he goes works on music. That's our entire life. You know what? We're happy little bees because we're doing what we love. This is your chance to do what you love. Do it. 

Sandi Spivey: 

That's great. That's great. Thank you to all our guests for sharing their experiences. That's really wonderful. And thank you for watching. I'm Sandi Spivey. Remember that knowledge, confidence, and hope can help us all improve our quality of life. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.


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