Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

Fighting Cancer In Your Kitchen

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript
View next

Published on March 1, 2013

Christopher Springmann encourages viewers to share their stories of real life wake-up calls encouraging them to improve their diets. He talks about an interview he did on this very topic with UCSF expert, Dr. Donald Abrams, an intergrative specialist and major advocate for healthy eating. How are you building a cancer-fighting kitchen? Hear tips on how you can make healthy eating a family affair.

Transcript | Fighting Cancer In Your Kitchen

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

Hello.  I’m Andrew Schorr for Patient Power. 

Anybody who has been touched by cancer wonders, can your diet make a difference.  Can it make a difference in preventing cancer, and if you have cancer, can that help by controlling what you eat and what you don’t eat.  Well, my friend Christopher Springmann, a regular contributor for Patient Power, has looked into that.  Here’s Chris’s report. 

Christopher Springmann:

Hello.  I’m Christopher Springmann for Patient Power.  I’d like to ask you a favor.  Would you please tell me how you and your family rally to support a loved one’s illness by making dietary and lifestyle changes?  Now, here’s the inspiration for my request.  We featured actor Terrence Howard, on a show, who told us that when his late mother was diagnosed with cancer it was like the whole family got cancer.  She died at age 56, and Howard went on to say that he hoped his heartbreak would be your wake-up call. 

But with that wake-up call in mind, I asked integrative oncologist, Dr. Donald Abrams at the University of California San Francisco about what lifestyle changes he encourages people to make when faced with a really scary health event like cancer, both during their treatment and afterwards.  His response was immediate: Diet, based on the idea that 30 percent of avoidable cancers may be attributed to what we eat and what we don’t eat.  Dr. Abrams tells his patients to build a cancer-fighting kitchen, where the whole family gets together and makes dietary changes. 

That’s why I’m holding this bottle of California extra virgin olive oil and a fork.  Now, the fork represents the simple idea that food can be medicine, so you either dig your grave with your fork or enhance your health with what the fork delivers.  Extra virgin olive oil represents mono unsaturated fats, part of an attainable, sustainable change where you adopt an organic plant-based diet: fruits, vegetables and lots of leafy greens. 

Now, in place of beef you can get animal protein from fish, like salmon and albacore tuna, and then there is organic chicken and eggs, too.  But say good-bye to sugary drinks, especially those with high fructose corn syrup, and say hello to green tea, lots of green tea.  You can read Dr. Abrams’ article entitled “Cancer and Nutrition” just below this video.  And please, tell me about your family’s experience with a disease and subsequent lifestyle changes.  E-mail me please, at comments@patientpower.info. 

I’m Christopher Springmann for Patient Power reminding you that knowledge, knowledge can be the very best medicine of all. Thanks for watching. 

Announcer:

Be sure to sign up for e-mail alerts by selecting a topic of interest to you and entering your e-mail address, and we’ll make sure you know about it. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

View next