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Lung Cancer Care: Community Oncologists and Academic Centers

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Published on February 19, 2019

Renowned lung cancer experts Dr. Theresa Ann Boyle and Dr. Stephen A. Rosenberg, both from the Moffitt Cancer Center, discuss ways community level care oncologists and major medical centers can collaborate to ensure lung cancer patients receive accurate testing and make informed treatment decisions. Watch now to learn their expert advice about maximizing lung cancer care.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power, in partnership with Moffitt Cancer Center. We thank AbbVie, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Foundation Medicine, and Novartis for their support.

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Transcript | Lung Cancer Care: Community Oncologists and Academic Centers

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So, Dr. Boyle, so there are people listening who maybe have had a biopsy somewhere else. Maybe at the community level. And here, you’ve got this big lab and you have other groups that you work with with huge analyzers and pathologists and all that that you work with. Somebody says, “Well, if I come to Moffitt” —oh, any other major cancer center, sometimes the request is made to have another biopsy or other tests. Why is that important today? Because do you have sometimes where maybe the initial analysis wasn’t as correct as it could be?

Dr. Boyle:                   

Right. It’s kinda like the bane of our existence. People like to say the tissue is an issue.

Andrew Schorr:          

Nice.

Dr. Boyle:                   

And it goes along with the “if you don’t have an adequate specimen you can only get so much information out of it.” The blood testing has really helped alleviate some of that pain, but when a procedure’s going to get a small bit of tissue from the lung, it can be less than 100 cells. And we’re trying to do the best we can to learn about 100 tumor cells. So, that’s why the biopsy is so important. And I was thinking maybe we can go around the wheel. We are missing the surgeon in here, but I love this appearance and how you can go around and around and around. 

Andrew Schorr:          

Right. 

Dr. Boyle:                   

But the patient usually first comes in and sees their oncologist and then a biopsy can be taken, and it goes to the anatomic pathologist and they determine is it adenocarcinoma or squamous cell cancer, small cell or some other primary cancer.  

And then the specimen to get to genetic testing. They go to the lab and that’s where we come in. We’re looking, “What’s the tumor cellularity? Is it enough for us to even test? Can we test with the targeted small panel if it’s not enough for big next generation sequencing panel?” And we do the sequencing on our big fancy machines, but we get the results. And it really requires pretty intensive interpretation to understands the results and make sure that we’re reporting out accurate results. 

Andrew Schorr:          

Yeah. I wanted you to speak to that. There’s an art to—there’s an art to medicine.

Dr. Boyle:                   

Well, yes. 

Dr. Gray:                     

Yes.

Andrew Schorr:          

Of course. But there’s an art to pathology. And so, you wanna give accurate recommendations of what are we dealing with to the medical team, the rest of the medical team, and that has an art to it, right? And you’re a subspecialist in that area.

Dr. Boyle:                   

Okay. Right. And we don’t want to overwhelm oncologists with too much information either. So, we’re very receptive to feedback about what’s most important for actually taking care of your patients that you’re seeing. And the resistance mutations have become very important. We used to only check for one part of the ALK gene and we got feedback from the oncologist that that wasn’t good enough. They need to look at all of the ALK gene for resistance mutations. So, back and forth.

And then we also have the help of the personalized medicine group here at Moffitt. And that’s wonderful. They havepharmacy degrees. So, they know about drug side effects. They know how to work with insurance companies. They know how to answer questions about what’s the functional effects of genetic changes. So, when we send out a report, it goes straight to the oncologist, but it also goes to the personalized medicine group for a more in-depth look. And maybe some help identifying clinical trials that the patient might be newly eligible for based on the genetic findings.  

And the radiation oncologists have become more involved too. As Stephen was talking about how the genetics can play a role in the care in terms of the radiation. There’s more and more clinical trials that are getting involved in together to better understand what’s the best therapy.

Andrew Schorr:          

So, Dr. Rosenberg, what I’m getting from this is a patient might see Dr. Gray or see you or maybe a surgeon with earlier stage lung cancer as well, but that there’s this whole group—Dr. Boyle, but she rattled off a few other groups as well that are all behind the scenes. And you guys are talking about me, the patient, right?

Dr. Boyle:                   

Oh, yeah.

Dr. Rosenberg:            

Yeah. Absolutely. I think that we are really in communication with each other on a pretty regular basis as a team. And I think that’s what really leads to this personalized care for the best outcome for the patient is really being very communicative about—between Dr. Gray and between Dr. Boyle, between the surgeons that we work with and just everybody really working together to try and make the best decision we can for each patient.  

And gathering all the right information upfront. I think that’s really the key is making sure we have all the right information we need, whether it’s molecular or imaging, before we go down a certain path, so we don’t go down the wrong path for any particular patient. And yeah, I think as we kind of put that information together we can help really personalize each person’s care that way. And from a radiation point of view we’re using both the imaging information that we’re getting and the molecular information to help make radiation decisions. 

And at Moffitt, we’re really trying to push those boundaries from imaging as well. And we talk about personalized care from these molecular changes, but Moffitt, this room will be opening up our MRI-guided radiation treatment unit which is the first in the country. There’s only a handful of places that are doing MRI-based radiation treatment. And that’s really another form of personalized care by seeing somebody’s anatomy up close and in a very particular way and designing the radiation based on individual anatomy. And so, with that better imaging we’re able to do that. So, there are a lot of ways to personalize care for patients moving forward.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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