Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

What Should I Ask My Doctor About Molecular Testing?

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on February 28, 2017

What kind of questions should I be asking my doctor about my lung cancer and molecular testing?  David LeDuc, the Executive Director of the Bonnie Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, says to start at the very beginning: ask your doctor if you have been tested and what were the results.  Learn how to be your own best advocate, even if you are newly diagnosed.  

Produced by Patient Power and Antidote in association with the Precision Medicine for Me Initiative.

Featuring

We love your videos and have been sharing them with our tumor specific private groups. You have some great lung cancer videos and we're very appreciative of the work you're doing.

— SURVIVEIT

You might also like

Transcript | What Should I Ask My Doctor About Molecular Testing?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

David LeDuc:

The first thing I would ask my doctor is have we done molecular tumor testing, have we done genomic profiling, and what were the results? If the answer is we have not, the next question to that doctor should be—well, what the next statement should be is we need to do this, right? 

In terms of having that conversation with the physician and understanding what it means, I think we can go back to that basic level of I understand that every cancer is different.  I understand that every treatment for every patient can be customized and personalized.  I want to make sure that I am receiving that same level and attention of care, and as such I'd like to get molecular tumor testing, or I'd like to have genetic profiling or whatever that language may be, so we can get you on the right path. 

Medicine is changing daily.  Treatment for lung cancer is changing daily, and what you have to do is be your own self-advocate, and part of that is becoming educated, and more importantly it's this understanding of I am an active participant in my care.  I have the right, the obligation to ask questions and demand that I receive standard of care.  And standard of care today means getting at least tested for EGFR, ALK, ROS1, and now with immunotherapy PD?L1 expression.  Those are really important pieces, and from a patient's perspective the more you can do to educate yourself and have that understanding the more you'll be able to have that dialogue.  

So if you're a patient who is newly diagnosed, who maybe doesn't understand even what molecular tumor testing is, the first thing I'd recommend is come to lungcancerfoundation.org, take a look at what's on the website, get our patient handbook, which will actually walk you through and explain to you what the differences are between cancers, cancer types, and give you a basic understanding and outline of what your cancer journey is going to look like.  

More importantly, there is a standard list of questions that you can go and you can get that you can take right back to your physician and ask these questions.  So even if you're not fully informed or fully educated on what all these things mean, at least you can start the conversation and then ask your care team to educate you on what it means.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

You might also like