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Dramatic Advances in Lung Cancer Research

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Published on March 27, 2017

Dr. Bruce Johnson of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute discusses the exciting advances in the development of immunotherapy and targeted therapy. Ongoing research includes more potent and specific inhibitors and reveals a subset of patients who are responding especially well to checkpoint inhibitors.

Produced by Patient Power and Antidote in association with the Precision Medicine for Me initiative.

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Transcript | Dramatic Advances in Lung Cancer Research

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Dr. Johnson:

One of the things that's dramatically changed our field is the discovery that the subset of patients that have a high predictive marker, that is PD-L1, are more likely to respond to the new classes of agents, the checkpoint inhibitor, and that they should get that as initial therapy then getting combination chemotherapy.  And not only do patients live longer, but they also have less toxicity, and this has now become a standard of care for about 20 to 30 percent of newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer. 

The second part that I'm very happy about is ongoing efforts with targeted therapy.  We are now able to target about 20 percent of patients with lung cancer and give them specific agents that are directed against the genomic change within their individual lung cancer. And not only do we have agents that can effectively target it, but ongoing research has identified both more potent as well as more specific inhibitors. So not only do they cause regressions in the majority of the patients, but also the duration for which they work has increased rather dramatically, sometimes two-fold compared to the initial set of agents that we used.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

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