Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

Lung Cancer Updates From ASCO

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on June 21, 2019

Is artificial intelligence changing the game in lung cancer care? On-site in Chicago at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting, renowned expert Dr. Nicholas Rohs, from Mount Sinai Hospital, discusses how modern technology is used to help doctors care for patients and move the field forward. Watch as Dr. Rohs shares the latest news in lung cancer.

Featuring

You might also like

Transcript | Lung Cancer Updates From ASCO

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Rebecca Seago-Coyle:

Hey, everyone. I'm here with Dr. Nick Rohs from Mount Sinai.  He's a long?time friend and partner of Patient Power in the lung cancer community. Dr. Rohs, thanks so much for being here.  

Dr. Rohs:

It's a pleasure to be here.  I always love coming and talking with you guys.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

Yeah, this is a great conference, huge, lots of information.  What can you tell us about what's coming out in terms of lung cancer? What can our lung cancer community hear from this conference?   

Dr. Rohs:

You know, I think ASCO always has some exciting lung cancer data.  I think the focus this year is not as much on new drugs that we're coming out with but learning more information about the drugs we know and also learning about how to predict and select out patients so we can maximize their benefit.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

So when you talk about predicting, are you talking about artificial intelligence?  

Dr. Rohs:

Well, I think that's one area where we're actually growing some of our knowledge, and artificial intelligence I think is absolutely part of our future.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

So I think a lot of our users may ask this too, are we saying like hey, Siri or hey, Google? 

Dr. Rohs:

Hey, Google, do I have a diagnosis?  In a way. We're using these machines to help do things that we can't do, because there's so much data that we're generating out of these trials right now and out of the new studies that we're running that it's impossible for us to process all this data.  We want all this data and we're generating it, biomarkers, imaging information, but to be able to translate it all and how it can help patients, it's too much.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

Right.  

Dr. Rohs:

So we use computers to help us sort of translate some of that data into more simple information and to process it all to sort of quiet out what I call the noise of some of that data.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

Okay, great. 

Dr. Rohs:

And I think one area that we're really trying to apply that is in lung cancer screening, and where we're able to get these low?dose lung cancer screens that the data is growing so much how helpful it is.  It is not only identifying more lung cancers but it's shifting stages.  We call it a stage shift where stage IV lung cancers are actually found when they're stage I lung cancer, which is game-changing.  And when we see these nodules on films for low?dose screening we have question marks.  And the only way that we know right now to figure out what it is is with a biopsy. 

Or, you know, there's some highly suspicious characteristics on a scan, but all this machine learning and artificial intelligence can actually help us with that decision.  It can take all this data and help process it so we're able to figure out which ones are more high risk and less high risk.   

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

Great.  And so how do you take this information that you get from ASCO back into your clinic?  

Dr. Rohs:

Taking it back, I think just one of the best things about ASCO is the people that I get to talk to and meet with, all the other experts in the field, and we just sort of bounce these ideas off of each other and how we think it applies to our day?to?day clinic.  And then I also love to come back to my own institute and talk to them about what's going on.  And then I share it with my patients, and sometimes it's really applicable to what I'm doing even on Monday.  I have clinic tomorrow, and I think there actually may be some things that I'm learning that I'll take to my clinic.  

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

That's amazing. And, you know, this year's theme for ASCO is caring for every patient and learning from every patient, and how do you take that back to—you know, how do you learn and care from all your patients? 

Dr. Rohs:

I think that's a perfect motto, and I think it's such an important concept that's evolving right now is that patient power.  Patients are such a powerful advocate for cancer care, moving the field forward, and I think that we do learn from every patient whether it's medically or emotionally, socially.  Everybody has a different picture that they come into my clinic with and very different backgrounds, so really every case is unique.  

One type of lung cancer is not the same in each person, and also really that's what we're coming out of this meeting with, is a lot of personalized medicine information, you know, all the different subtypes of lung cancer that we're learning about. We already know that there's ALK, ROS, RET, BRAF, all these different subtypes of lung cancer, but now we're actually learning more about those subtypes, the science behind them, the biology behind them so that we can really cater personalized medicine to them. 

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

That's great, and I think that's really powerful, and I'm sure our lung cancer community will really appreciate that information.  

Dr. Rohs:

Absolutely. 

Rebecca Seago?Coyle:

Dr. Rohs, thank you so much for joining us today.  Thank you for the information.  Thank you for always being here and answering our questions.  

As we say at Patient Power, knowledge can be the best medicine.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.