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Will CAR T-Cell Therapy Benefit Lung Cancer Patients?

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Published on April 4, 2019

Does CAR-T cell therapy have a role in lung cancer care? Are there new targeted immunotherapies in development for lung cancer? Leading lung cancer expert Dr. Jhanelle Gray, from Moffitt Cancer Center, joined Patient Power to discuss ongoing research on personalized immunotherapy approaches. Dr. Gray explains what challenges CAR-T may present when treating lung cancer patients and the potential for ICE-T therapy. Tune in to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power, in partnership with Moffitt Cancer Center. We thank AbbVie, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Foundation Medicine, and Novartis for their support.

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Transcript | Will CAR T-Cell Therapy Benefit Lung Cancer Patients?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:                     

Here’s another aspect of immunotherapy. So, we talked about these PD1, PD-L1 drugs, checkpoint inhibitors. So, another area that’s particularly happening in the leukemia’s that I know well is what’s known as CAR T-cell therapy, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. Where if I get it right, correct me if I’m wrong, you can sort of engineer t-cells to become sort of a targeted therapy.

Dr. Gray:                     

Yes.

Andrew Schorr:          

All right. So, what about this in lung cancer, Dr. Gray?

Dr. Gray:                     

Yeah. So, it’s a great question. So, one of the areas—this has really taken off in the hematologic malignancies are these CAR-T therapies. The hematologic malignancies are very well-defined by specific markers on the cells that are uniformly found across different types. So, lymphomas, leukemias. In the solid tumor realm, it’s been a little bit more of a challenge with finding where to specifically target. And also, to target the cells without adding significant toxicity to the patients.

So, we do have what’s called an ICE-T therapy here. It’s the immune and cellular therapy. It has medical oncologists on that team, both hematologists and hematologists. And they’re working together to help bring what we’ve learned from the hematology world over to the solid tumor realm. So, it’s new. I don’t think it’s yet ready for FDA approval, but absolutely a very exciting, exciting field. Again, the purpose of these is to create these long-lasting responses with a personalized medicine approach.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.