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CAR T-Cell Therapy Shows Promise for Mantle Cell Lymphoma Treatment

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Published on December 23, 2019

“One of the more exciting things that we’re seeing here, at this meeting, is the use of CAR T-cells in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma,” says Dr. Ian Flinn from Tennessee Oncology, speaking with Patient Power Co-Founder Andrew Schorr at the 2019 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting & Exposition. Watch as Dr. Flinn explains CAR T-cell therapy and how it may benefit MCL patients who are not responding to other treatments. Dr. Flinn also touches on what progress is being made in clinical trials and other research updates shared at the conference.

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Thanks to Mr. Schorr for excellent calm interviews and opinions by experts which allowed me to have meaningful discussions with my doctors over the course of my treatments.

— Graham, lymphoma survivor

Transcript | CAR T-Cell Therapy Shows Promise for Mantle Cell Lymphoma Treatment

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

Hello.  I'm Andrew Schorr here in Orlando where across the street there's a big meeting that's going on, American Society of Hematology.  With me is a lymphoma expert from Tennessee Oncology, Dr. Ian Flinn.  Dr. Flinn, there are many types of lymphoma.  One of them is mantle cell.  So where are we now with progress for mantle cell for patients? 

Dr. Flinn:

So there are—therapies for mantle cell lymphoma have radically changed over the last 10 to 15 years.  We've seen what 20 years ago was when it was—when lymphoma was first being described and outcomes were unfortunately very poor for this group of patients to the natural history of this disease has been changed radically.  

Some of that is from very aggressive therapies up front, such as using aggressive chemotherapies and stem cell transplant, but we've also come to recognize there's a group of patients that don't need such aggressive therapy and they can use a less intense therapy with still very good outcomes. 

But I think one of the more exciting things we're seeing here at this meeting is use of CAR‑T cells in the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma.  So we'll see the results of a drug called ZUMA‑2 where CAR‑T cells are being applied for—to patients who have had multiple prior therapies and unfortunately things aren't going so well for them, but they're able to get these CAR‑T cells and have very deep remissions and I think durable remissions that haven't been seen prior to this.  So I think that's really exciting news. 

Andrew Schorr:

Okay.  So the march goes on.  Should people with mantle cell have hope? 

Dr. Flinn:

I would—absolutely.  Like I was starting out, it's completely different today than it was 10 years ago, the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma.  We're seeing the introduction of much more targeted therapies.  There's now three different Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors that are approved for mantle cell lymphoma.  Venetoclax (Venclexta), while not approved for mantle cell lymphoma is making its way into clinical trials now in combination with these targeted therapies getting away from some of the classic cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and getting very deep and durable remissions, so it's a really new world. 

Andrew Schorr:

Okay.  Dr. Flinn, good news for people with mantle cell and an active dialogue that you have with your doctor as this landscape changing.  Take a look at what we're doing in mantle cell on patientpower.info as we continue to keep you informed and to give you hope and confidence that you can have as full a life as possible.  

I'm Andrew Schorr.  Remember, knowledge can be the best medicine of all. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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