Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

How Often Should I Have Checkups Post-Stem Cell Transplant?

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript
View next

Published on June 7, 2016

Patient Power community member, Johnny asks "I had a stem cell transplant (SCT) five years ago. How often should I be having checkups?" Myeloma expert Dr. Jatin Shah of MD Anderson Cancer Center shares his recommendation and sums everything up with stressing the need to watch your disease closely.

Featuring

Transcript | How Often Should I Have Checkups Post-Stem Cell Transplant?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Andrew Schorr:

Johnny writes in with this question, doctor: “I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and had a stem cell transplant five years ago. I feel great, and I've been in complete remission for a long time. How often should I be having checkups?” 

Dr. Shah:               

That’s a fantastic question and congratulations; we’re very happy that you’re doing well, this well, this long after a stem cell transplant.

What we would normally recommend is for you to continue to get follow-up every two to three months. We don’t want to get complacent, here. I think that ultimately, there are a subset of patients with myeloma that may do well for a long time; 10, 15, 20 years. And you may be hopefully one of those. 

But we still want to follow patients very closely, because, unfortunately, we don't know if and when the myeloma will come back. And so I would still follow patients every three months, even if you’re doing well five years out, just to not get complacent and watch your disease closely. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

View next