Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

Is a Genetic Panel Recommended for Children of Patients With Myeloma?

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on December 14, 2017

Is multiple myeloma hereditary? A panel of myeloma experts including Dr. Gareth Morgan from UAMS Myeloma Institute and Dr. Brian Walker from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences discuss the question. Watch as they explain if children should be genetically tested if their parents have multiple myeloma.

This town meeting is sponsored by Amgen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Takeda Oncology. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with the UAMS Myeloma Institute.

Featuring

Partners

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Myeloma Center

You might also like

Transcript | Is a Genetic Panel Recommended for Children of Patients With Myeloma?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Female Speaker:

My question is, is myeloma hereditary? Can it be given to children, offspring?

Dr. Morgan:     

We’ve found about 20 genes that can increase the increase of having myeloma. So you could think that I’m some sort of expert at the genetics of myeloma, and I can pretty much unequivocally tell you you’re not going to pass it on to your children, so you should be reassured.

Jeff Folloder:   

I’m going to follow on, because one of our online questions asks about kids. It says: is a genetic panel recommended for children of patients with myeloma?

I know it’s likely to be costly, but would it be beneficial at all? And from what I’m hearing from you, everybody’s shaking their head no; don’t bother with genetic testing of the children.

Alan Stephenson:        

I would like to say that that was one of my biggest concerns when we met the first time. That was probably one of the most emotional things of dealing with the diagnosis. I already suspected I had bone cancer. I had asked my primary care doctor if he thought I might have it. So when they told me, it wasn’t a big shock to me. I just somehow suspected it. and it really had not even crossed my mind until I was talking to him, and I fell apart because oh, my gosh. And when he told me that there was no evidence of it being hereditary, that was such a huge relief to me.

Jeff Folloder:   

Brian, can you help us out here with the genetic component? You’re the one staring at the genes all day long; are we really okay with giving our kids a pass?

Dr. Walker:      

Yes, definitely. Again, we’ve done lots of studies looking at the inherited risks of myeloma. And although as Gareth said, there are some variants in the genome that can be associated with myeloma, they are really, really low risk—so much so that it’s nothing to worry about whatsoever about passing it on to your children.

Jeff Folloder:   

Does that answer your question?

Alan Stephenson:        

I will say that one of the benefits of being treated at UAMS is that most of the people in the waiting room are here for multiple myeloma. And that is a big misconception out there. I’ve had people argue with me in the waiting room saying yes, it’s hereditary. So that’s something we need to be spreading the word about.

That hey, we’ve got enough to worry about when we’re told we’ve got this. Let’s don’t make up things that aren’t true to worry about, right? So we need to spread that word. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

You might also like