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Is It My Myeloma or Age?

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Published on May 12, 2017

Age or myeloma? In this Patient Power clip, Host Dr. Susan Leclair answers a patient question on whether their morning body aches are related to aging or their myeloma. Dr. Leclair confirms that yes, body aches are certainly caused by age but could definitely be coming from the myeloma treatment as well. To follow, she provides some suggestions for dealing with body aches. Dr. Leclair is a Patient Power Host and retired chancellor professor from the Department of Medical Laboratory Science at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth.

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Transcript | Is It My Myeloma or Age?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Question:

I’m living with myeloma. My M-spike is “not observed” and in 2014, I went through chemo, then had a stem cell transplant later that year. When I wake up in the morning, everyone bone in my body seems to ache! I am 69. Are the aches part of the MM or just age?

Dr. Leclair:

Well, I’m 70, so I’m going to tell you it’s part of age, because I certainly have them periodically. The answer is yes on multiple levels, Yes, part of it is your age. Wear and tear are definite changes whether we like it or not. You had chemo. That’s a big stressor in the bone marrow in particular. Where’s the bone marrow found? Found in every single one of your bones to a greater or lesser extent, but they’r all there. You had a stem cell transplant. That takes about three years for your body to not only accept the stem cell transplant itself and adjust itself to both the new cells and the new drugs to go along with the new cells but also to deal with the fact that they have to rebuild your immune system, that they have to rebuild your functioning. That’s going to hurt for a long time.

One of the rules of thumbs is that even for a simple surgery it takes full year for you to completely heal and be on your way. So something like the combination of chemo and stem cell transplant, you’re looking at a long time for that. So yes, there are going to be aches and pains. You might want to talk to your physician about maybe some kind of - I’m the last person in the world to talk about exercise - but some of kind maybe yoga or some kind of low-level flexibility balance exercise that you might do that might be able to help you..

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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