Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

Developments in Myeloma: What Are BiTEs?

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on November 16, 2018

During a recent Town Meeting in Atlanta, Patient Power host and advocate Jack Aiello is joined by myeloma expert Dr. Jonathan Kaufman, from the Winship Cancer Institute, to give an update on immunotherapies for multiple myeloma. How can BiTES benefit myeloma patients? Dr. Kaufman discusses how BiTES work to treat myeloma, how this strategy compares to CAR-T cell therapy and explains where research is today. Tune in to find out more.

This town meeting is sponsored by Amgen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Adaptive Biotechnologies. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

Featuring

Partners

Winship Cancer Institute

You might also like

Transcript | Developments in Myeloma: What Are BiTEs?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

BiTEs, or bi?specific T?cell engagers, are molecule that attach both to the myeloma cell, similar to the monoclonal antibodies, and the other side of the molecule attaches to a T cell.  So instead of reengineering the T cell we have a molecule that attaches to the myeloma cell and attaches to the immune cell and brings them together and essentially does the same job, forces the T?cell to be physically in proximity, physically close to the myeloma cell, and then the T cell can then attack the myeloma cell.   

And this is very early in development in myeloma, and we're just starting to hear that this also could be a potentially beneficial strategy similar to what we've seen with the CAR?T cells.  There is history of BiTEs being effective in other cancers, and this is the first time that we're just starting to see information about BiTEs in myeloma.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.