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What the BOSTON Study Means for Multiple Myeloma Patients

What the BOSTON Study Means for Multiple Myeloma Patients
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Published on June 25, 2020

What the BOSTON Study Means for Multiple Myeloma Patients

Promising news for relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma patients comes from a clinical trial presented at the recent American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, held virtually this year. The phase III BOSTON trial demonstrated significant results for patients with myeloma who had received one to three prior therapies.

The trial assessed once-weekly selinexor (Xpovio) along with once-weekly bortezomib (Velcade) and low-dose dexamethasone (SVd) against standard twice-weekly Velcade plus low-dose dexamethasone (Vd). Patients in the study on the SVd therapy saw a 47 percent increase in progression-free survival (PFS), meaning they lived 47 percent longer without their disease worsening.

The National Cancer Institute identifies multiple myeloma as the second most common blood cancer in the United States. There is currently no known cure and patients living with the disease typically progress following treatment with currently available therapies. The BOSTON study results offer new hope to patients who have already been through the standard treatment options.

Next week, Patient Power Co-Founder Andrew Schorr will speak with Dr. Paul Richardson, a multiple myeloma expert from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, about the current landscape for myeloma patients and what treatments are on the horizon.

To watch the interview and read the transcript, sign up for e-news and we’ll deliver it right to your inbox.

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