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Can Regular Exercise Reduce Fatigue in Myeloma?

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Published on November 2, 2017

Andrew Schorr, Founder of Patient Power, and Melanie House, a physical therapist from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, discuss studies that showcase the influence of physical activity on a myeloma patient’s well-being. Tune in to increase your understanding of what a difference exercise can make on symptom management and treatment.

The Living Well With Myeloma series is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene, Takeda, Amgen and AbbVie for their support.

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Transcript | Can Regular Exercise Reduce Fatigue in Myeloma?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

What's the studies now about exercise being a good thing for cancer patients?

Melanie House:

Well, there are several studies that have come out.  One was a systematic review that actually looked at the influence of exercise on fatigue, quality of life, strength.  And what they've shown really is—you know, you have to look at the quality of the study, but the good-quality studies have shown that regular exercise that started before or shortly after transplant can actually help reduce fatigue, can actually help maintain strength or prevent the loss of muscle mass. 

Pain is another issue that we've looked at, and that is something that I'm actually finding that massage can be beneficial for the myeloma population.  So there's a lot of good evidence out there that exercise, like I said, specific to the patient's need, not just aerobic, but they also need strengthening, will help to not only minimize the loss of strength, improve their quality of life.

But one of the studies actually showed that the patients that did some exercise twice a day as compared to the group that didn't have any formal exercise, they got discharged two days sooner than the group that didn't really exercise.  That makes a big difference.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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