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What Nutrition Guidelines Are Most Beneficial to Myeloma Patients?

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Published on October 9, 2018

How can multiple myeloma patients make good, nutritious food choices throughout their treatment journey? Are specific diets recommended? Patient Power host and advocate, Jack Aiello, is joined by expert Kristen Carter, an APRN from The UAMS Myeloma Institute, to share tips and strategies to help myeloma patients maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle during or after treatment. Watch now to find out more.

Produced by Patient Power. We thank AbbVie, Inc., Celgene Corporation, and Takeda Oncology for their support.

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Transcript | What Nutrition Guidelines Are Most Beneficial to Myeloma Patients?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jack Aiello:

Kristen Carter:

I tend to be—I like to look at the whole body.  I'm definitely a person that adopts a very clean diet and exercise program myself personally, and so I think that nutrition makes a huge difference just in everyday life.  Now, do we recommend an alkaline diet and a ketogenic-based diet?  Absolutely not.  If you want to do that, we're welcome to let you do whatever you feel comfortable, but I do tell patients that it's very important to continue to eat good, nutritious—good nutritious diet.  

And also exercise.  I think it makes a huge difference in fatigue and overall well-being to get good exercise and have just a well-balanced diet. But we still do not adopt, you know, specialized diets, sugar-buster diets for myeloma.  I have actually had patients that we've gotten after they've done two years of alternative therapy, and if you want to complement your treatment with alternative therapy we say as long as it doesn't interfere with the type of therapy that we're prescribing, go for it.  

But as far as doing alternative diets and therapy, we still have not adopted that or seen a huge benefit to the patients.  So I just tell my patients to live your life, have a good nutrition and exercise program. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.