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Research on Combination Therapies for Myeloma

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Published on November 5, 2019

Noted multiple myeloma expert Dr. Krina Patel from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discusses research on how adding a fourth drug may help more multiple myeloma patients achieve a minimal residual disease (MRD) state or progression-free survival in the beginning stages of treatment. Dr. Patel also shares insight on data from the GRIFFIN trial, which involves a fourth drug, daratumumab with VRD (Velcade, Revlimid and dexamethasone), and is expected to be presented at the 2019 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting‎ in December. Watch now to hear updates about myeloma therapies.

This town hall meeting is sponsored by Janssen Biotech, Inc. and Karyopharm Therapeutics with additional support to our partner, Myeloma Crowd (MCR), from Takeda Oncology and Foundation Medicine. These organizations have no editorial control, and Patient Power is solely responsible for the content. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Transcript |

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Patel:                    

Our goal is to get the best response at the beginning. So, when we start treatment, if I can’t cure yet, our goal is to knock the myeloma down when it’s the—I call it the dumbest, when it hasn’t seen any drugs yet—we know we can work the best. The better the response we get, what we call a deeper response, we know the patients do.

One of the biomarkers we use for this right now is something called minimal residual disease. We know that the patients who get into minimal residual disease and stay there for at least a year, the myeloma hibernates a lot longer. So, our goal is to get as many patients to that state as possible when we start treatment.

I think there are patients who get to that with our triplets. So, the question really is adding a fourth drug, which patients is that going to help to get into that state? More of our patients can get into the best response and have the longest hibernation or progression-free survival, then yes, we want to add that fourth drug.

 

Now, we have early response rates from the GRIFFIN trial, which daratumumab (Darzalex) with VRD (Velcade, Revlimid and dexamethasone). I think they’re gonna present it soon. I think by ASH, we will have the rest of the data that really tells us, “Is there a specific patient group that we actually help or does this sort of help everybody?” We’ve done trials with four drugs before, before I joined myeloma, but with Cytoxan, bortezomib (Velcade), lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone (Decadron).

There, unfortunately, toxicity was much higher and we didn’t see a better response. I think this has a much better chance. In terms of toxicities, we have to see the long-term data. I do think there’s a group of patients who have high-risk myeloma, for instance. I’m hoping that four-drug really does help those patients.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.