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Which Myeloma Patients Could Benefit From Anti-BCMA Trials?

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Published on January 14, 2020

Key Takeaways

  • DREAMM is a series of studies, built around an ADC drug called belantamab mafodotin.
  • Most anti-BCMA and ADC clinical trials are only available to patients who have had prior treatments (relapsed or refractory patients)
  • Ask your doctor if you could qualify for this type of trial.

Multiple myeloma expert Dr. Sikander Ailawadhi, from the Mayo Clinic, joins Esther Schorr to discuss the DREAMM study, which is investigating the use of anti-BCMA antibody-drug conjugates to treat relapsed/refractory myeloma patients. Dr. Sikander also touches of the process of drug development, clinical trial eligibility, and why it's important for patients to ask about different avenues of therapy they may qualify for.

This program is sponsored by GSK. This organization has no editorial control. It is produced by Patient Power. Patient Power is solely responsible for the content.

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Transcript | Which Myeloma Patients Could Benefit From Anti-BCMA Trials?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Dr. Ailawadhi:

So this is to go—to understand about the process of drug development.  

Esther Schorr:

Right. 

Dr. Ailawadhi:

So the first step is always to make sure that something is safe.  The second process—step is to make sure that it has benefit.  And the third process is—or step is to make sure that it has more benefit than the current standard.  Right now with all of these drugs the safety is being established and it is coming out, but they're available only for patients who have had prior therapy and are getting—so some other therapies may not have worked, and a majority of these clinical trials will have those requirements, that the patient should have had X number of lines of therapy, should have been treated with this or this or this prior agent and that the agent has stopped working, then they may become eligible for those treatments.  

But I would say rather than that burden of thought being in the minds of patients and caregivers, ask the question.  Because if you don't ask about it, you may not know about an avenue that may exist.  Because these are not easy paths to walk through, of trying to get the doctor to have a referral and find the right center, get there, contact somebody, insurances, travel, all of this is a problem, but the first step has to be made is ask the question. 

Esther Schorr:

So I know a number of patients have asked us about something called the DREAMM Study.  Is that something you could just tell us what that is. 

Dr. Ailawadhi:

Okay. 

Esther Schorr:

And put it in context? 

Dr. Ailawadhi:

So the DREAMM is a series of studies, so there's a DREAMM-1, DREAMM-2, and at this ASH there was some information about planned DREAMM, 3, 4, 5, and hopefully down the road there will be more. 

Esther Schorr:

That’s a lot of dreaming. 

Dr. Ailawadhi:

I know, lot of dreaming. 

Esther Schorr:

Lot of dreaming.  

Dr. Ailawadhi:

So all of this platform, the DREAMM platform is built around one of those ADC drugs.  The name of that drug is belantamab mafodotin, difficult name, but belantamab, which has that concept of the antibody‑drug conjugate that you have a drug latching on again to that BCMA and delivering a payload to kill the cell. 

So there is not much clinical data that has come out of this ASH on the DREAMM trials because, as we are told and as we understand, that data is being reviewed by the FDA to find out whether it meets the criteria that it may be approved or not. 

Esther Schorr:

Got it.  

Dr. Ailawadhi:

But I can say that that is the drug to consider for that expanded access. 

Esther Schorr:

Okay.  Very good.  Thank you. 

Dr. Ailawadhi:

So good to ask the question if you may—if a patient may qualify for the‑‑it may be the right time, the right patient, the right treatment.  They may benefit because the initial results from that data are very encouraging. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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