Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

What Treatments Are Available If Myelofibrosis Progresses to AML?

Read Transcript

Published on November 13, 2018

How many myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients go on to develop secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML)? What medicines are offered to treat it? Dedicated MPN researcher Dr. Naval Daver, from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains what percentage of myelofibrosis (MF) patients typically progress to AML and the treatment options available today. What health outcomes can patients expect? Dr. Daver also discusses patient response rates, progress in AML treatment and gives insight to clinical research on secondary AML. Watch now to find out more. 

Produced in partnership with the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

Featuring

Partners

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

You might also like

Transcript | What Treatments Are Available If Myelofibrosis Progresses to AML?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So, you mentioned another leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, AML. So first of all, there’s a percentage of us with myelofibrosis that may progress to that, how do you spot it, and do you have medicines now that can help us?

Dr. Daver:                   

So, AML, which is acute myeloid leukemia, it comes in two big flavors. So, one is what we call spontaneous or de novo AML. So, you have a new patient. He never had a blood condition or other cancer. He comes in with AML. That’s the majority, 80 percent. Then you have the 20 percent who get AML from a previous disease. It could be myelofibrosis, it could myelodysplastic, it could be other kinds of anemia. And those are unfortunately, also the ones that have what we call high-risk, or adverse, mutations or chromosome changes. 

So, they inherently do poorly in general. This happens in about 15 to 20 percent of myelofibrosis patients over a ten-year period. So, it’s not common, but it does happen over a long period of time. So, there are many new drugs in AML, actually approved, so this has been one of the cancers in the last two years where there has been the most dramatic progress, maybe along with lung cancer. 

And there’s one specific drug called daunorubicin and cytarabine (Vyxeos), or CPX, is the name of the drug, that was developed, and the first three trials specifically looked at people with secondary AML, meaning AML from myelofibrosis or MDS, or other preexisting conditions versus standard treatment that we had, which was 3+7 induction-based regimens. That’s the standard AML treatment.  

And this drug doubled the overall survival, at the follow-up time point, and it also improved their response rate. But still, the overall survival at five years is about 40 percent, as opposed to 20 percent, which it was. So, it’s double, it’s not great. So, we’re still trying to improve this with the number of other drugs in the AML arena. So, the bottom line is, there is progress even in that, what we used to consider the worst of the worst leukemia groups, AML, secondary AML group. But, it’s moving ahead as well.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

You might also like