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Is Clinical Trial Participation Parallel to the Pace of Drug Development?

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Published on April 11, 2019

Can low clinical trial enrollment stifle advances in cancer care? Guest clinical trials expert Dr. Richard Schilsky, from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, discusses why, especially in the age of precision medicine, trial participation is critical to getting reliable data and making treatment research developments. Patient advocate and the longest-living #Gleevec survivor Mel Mann also shares his clinical trial experience with a breakthrough chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) therapy. Tune in to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank AbbVie, Inc., Astellas, Celgene Corporation, and Novartis for their support.

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Transcript | Is Clinical Trial Participation Parallel to the Pace of Drug Development?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

And most clinical trials in order to produce a reliable result are going to require a minimum of 50 to 100 patients.  Some require many hundreds of patients or even many thousands of patients depending on the question being asked.  So you can see if people are not participating it's going to take long time to get those answers. 

Right.  In my case, I was in a trial related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia, three-drug combination, and I received that in a Phase II trial 10 years before that was approved.  So it was a long time.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.