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Coping With Cancer and Coronavirus Anxiety

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Published on April 24, 2020

Key Takeaways

Being a cancer patient, survivor or care partner has its own set of worries and concerns. For many, the coronavirus has only heightened those anxieties and made them feel uniquely vulnerable. How can people cope with the uncertainty of the pandemic on top of the stress of having cancer?

Patient Power Co-Founder Esther Schorr is joined by Eucharia Borden, from Cancer Support Community, and family therapist Jennifer Abraham to discuss ways to help reduce anxiety and deal with the added stress of the current COVID-19 situation. Watch to learn about coping strategies and resources for emotional and financial support.

[Due to extreme load on our website and Zoom platform, viewers may experience a time delay between the audio and video of the interview - please note the transcript can be read below.]

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Transcript | Coping With Cancer and Coronavirus Anxiety

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Recorded on April 23, 2020

Esther Schorr:
Greetings, this is Esther Schorr with Patient Power. Today's conversation is going to be a little less medical, clinical and a lot more dealing with some emotional topics. Being a cancer patient, survivor and a care partner has its own set of worries and ongoing concerns about their current health and future wellness. But this pandemic, this coronavirus pandemic, has only heightened that anxiety for a lot of people, me included. So what we wanted to try to do today with the help of a couple of experts, is to figure out and discuss what you can do to help lessen anxiety and deal with the added stress of the current COVID-19 situation. So to help us with this, we have two very special guests. The first is Eucharia Borden, she is the Senior Director of Clinical Services for the Cancer Support Community, and welcome, Eucharia. Thank you for being with us.

Eucharia Borden:
Thank you.

Esther Schorr:
Her organization, the Cancer Support Community is a very large network of cancer support programs worldwide, and as we go on with our conversation, Eucharia will be able to share with us a little bit more about the resources that they offer. Our other guest is Jennifer Abraham, who has been on—Jennifer. Jennifer happens to be a member of the Patient Power staff. She is also a cancer survivor and thriver, and she is a family therapist, as well as a very active patient advocate. So I really appreciate both of you being with us today.
 
Before we get started, I just want to remind those of you who are listening, that at the bottom of your Zoom screen, is a question and answer button. And if, as we're having our conversation, you have a question that you'd like to pose to our experts and have us discuss, we'll try to get to as many of them as we can. We already have some ahead of time, but just put them in that field. And then we have one of our staff members, Andrea, who will pass those questions on to me, so we can kind of pepper those into our conversation.
 
So with that I think we'll get started. So since most cancer patients are at higher risk of complications with the coronavirus, and that seems to be the general understanding from the medical community, I think maybe what I'd like to talk a little bit about is from the two of you, how does one cope with the uncertainty that's now overlaid on the stress that cancer already creates? And maybe Eucharia—it's kind of a big question, but what do you think?

Eucharia Borden:
Yes, it is a big question, and there are a lot of layers to a question about uncertainty. Let's face it. This is an uncertain time for everyone. Our patients, our providers, the answers that we need are not clear sometimes, not readily available sometimes. And, this is one of those times where I really stress with patients or with colleagues to acknowledge where you are, and what's happening for you. Sometimes I think pre-pandemic, we might've had the tendency to brush something off, or look on the bright side, or just be positive. And things like that, can actually lead to more anxiety, because it doesn't allow us to really connect with the place where we are. And in not connecting with where we are, we're not able to attend to our needs—like maybe our need to reach out to a counselor or a friend or a social worker or a doctor or a therapist, to say that, "This is where I am, and I need help."
 
And so the first thing I would say is to really pause and connect with what's going on, so that maybe you can identify if you can, sometimes you can't, but to really be able to identify what's making you feel that way. Is it that you're being asked to come into a hospital for your treatment, and you're not sure you want to be out of your home? Is it that you want to be out of your home because you want treatment, but perhaps you're being told right now we want to put your treatment on hold? Is it that you need some routine scans that you're now being advised not to do? So there are different reasons why people are going to feel uncertain, but I think the starting point is really important. And that's where I'd like to start our discussion today, because we can get into ways to deal with that uncertainty, but if we're just moving past it, that actually may lead to more anxiety.

Esther Schorr:
Okay. So what I heard here was, first it's recognizing that you need some help in sorting this out.

Eucharia Borden:
Yes.

Esther Schorr:

So, Jennifer, how do you ask for help? I mean, how do you make peace with asking for help and then accepting it? Because I know a lot of people they feel like they're weak if they ask for help. But can you give some advice about how to overcome that in this kind of a stressful situation?

Jennifer Abraham:

Well, I think kind of tying it into what Eucharia said, is that, it's important to accept the fact that you might need help. So you have to start at that really basic level. I'm feeling overwhelmed. Maybe I need someone to drive with me, maybe I need someone to talk to. Maybe I need someone to go to the pharmacy and pick up my prescription. So I think it starts at that really basic level of this is so insane for so many people, for people without cancer. So I think if we can kind of—I know for myself, I've had to accept the fact that I can't go to the supermarket, I can't go out, I can't do these things, and I'm having to ask people. It's incredibly difficult. It's new for me. But with the acceptance of the fact that this isn't going to change, what seems to be for a long time, and people with cancer, we really need to be careful.
 
We are going to have to learn to be a little bit uncomfortable and ask for help. So what I've been telling people is, you just have to do it. You put one foot in front of the other, and maybe you just ask somebody to take your garbage down to the end of the driveway. Start with something really small. And the other thing I've been telling people is that, it actually makes people feel good. You're doing them a favor, because helping people is kind of what makes us feel good. So give someone an opportunity to help you. That's how I've been kind of working with this.

Esther Schorr:

And that's really helpful to me. I think back to, for example, when my husband was first diagnosed with cancer, that it was hard for me to ask people to do things, because I felt like that was my job. But then there were good friends who said, "I'm just putting stuff in your refrigerator when you guys come home. I'm going to just drop some things off." And once I saw that, that in a sense was giving them pleasure, it was making them feel less helpless, then it was okay. And as a segue into this, somebody from our audience, Sandra, took a different spin on this, and had a question that I'd love to get your guys' input. What Sandra said was, she said, "Usually I'm the helper in my family. Even offering to let family members stay in my home to regroup and get a new start. Now I can't invite my family at all." And she feels terribly guilty about backing out of commitments that give her pleasure. So she said she feels selfish to put her own health needs ahead of others. Thoughts?

Jennifer Abraham:
So it's interesting. I'm going to use my 16-year-old daughter as an example for this. Her friends gave her a hard time, because she wouldn't go out when this whole thing started. And they said, "Come on, it's not that serious. And people can go out." And she said, "If I get coronavirus, and I bring it home to my mother, she'll die." And it was—I mean, I hate it. I hate that my 16-year-old has to actually think that way, and actually has to say those things. But she said, "Mom, I don't feel bad that I'm not going." And I suspect that for people to feel guilty about not doing what they normally do, because I understand what that is. Guilt is probably an ongoing thing, right? So if we learn anything from this, maybe it's to just, self-care has to come, has to be paramount. Otherwise, we won't be able to take care of the people that we love.

Esther Schorr:
So it's not selfish? It's…

Jennifer Abraham:
…it's not that. Self-care is completely different than selfish.

Esther Schorr:
Okay. Eucharia? Thoughts on this?

Eucharia Borden:
I agree. Self-care and selfish are two different things, and yet for someone in this situation, they can feel like the same thing. And one of the most important things that we can do right now, is to be compassionate with ourselves. Sometimes the feelings of guilt that we have, they're certainly real. However, sometimes I find that, we are the ones that are feeling it. And it may not be a shared experience. And so speaking up, sometimes just taking that extra step, helps the other person to put things into perspective, or you may find that the other person says, "That makes sense." But it's asking people to be a little bit courageous, with honoring just that spot where they are. The feelings of guilt, those are completely normal. You're not alone in feeling that. And I think one of the things that this pandemic has sort of bubbled up to the surface, is the need to prioritize that self-care.
 
Whereas before, for some people, maybe not you, but for some people, it may have felt optional. And in this case, it really is optimal rather than optional and so maybe just reframing it to think about it that way. And I guess a silver lining, if you want to think of it that way, is that right now, because of where we are in the world, you have sort of even more impetus to give yourself permission to do those things, in a way that more people actually understand now at a time where they may not have before.

Esther Schorr:
So in a sense, if I'm hearing this right, it's really, if you don't take care of yourself in this particular environment especially, you're going to not only be impacting yourself, but you're impacting a lot of other people. Which is a whole discussion about, “Well, why shouldn't I go back to work if I feel fine?” That doesn't make sense in the world we're in right now. It's like, we have to be thinking about the impact of our own behavior on other people as well. So if we're well, great, but if we need to be sure we really are well, whether it's physically, mentally or emotionally, that makes sense?

Eucharia Borden:

It does. I mean, this is one of those times where it's not even just about taking care of ourselves, but it's really taking care of each other at the same time. Which can feel confusing though, because this is a time where even our leaders, our government leaders may not agree on what's best or how to do this. And so depending on where our information is coming from, it can conflict sometimes with that urge to take care of yourself versus be there. So I would also say, tune in when you need to, to get information about, just, what do I need to do? What are these sort of instructions that my governor or whomever in your community has for you? But also tune out when you need to, because that's a part of it. And I know we'll get into that.
 
But that kind of feeds into that when someone is feeling guilty in this way, because, let's say that you're in an area where you're being encouraged to be with other people, but you're still feeling like I need to take care of myself in this way. Those feelings can actually heighten the guilt that you're feeling. So I absolutely can see where that would be an issue.

Esther Schorr:
Okay. So just want to remind people who are listening, and we do have a wonderful audience there, that if you do have questions, feel free to put them in the Q&A, and we'll try to answer as many as we can. Let me switch gears just a little bit. I know that overlaid on the health concerns that people have, and now we're also talking about emotional concerns, and feeling healthy and not anxious. Overlaid on that, is a lot of people are now burdened with financial concerns, and insurance worries for themselves, for their family members. Is there anything in addition to the things we've talked about, that might be helpful to people dealing with those in addition?

Jennifer Abraham:
Well, I can just say what comes to my mind is that I think the story we tell ourselves is usually way worse than what the reality is. And that we might have panic about, an insurance company isn't going to pay a bill, or we're not going to be able to get our medication. But the thing is, if we start from the beginning, and what I've recommended too, is you make a list of some of the companies that you're most worried about, and you get on the phone and call them. Now it's a lot of people are not working, so you might have to wait longer. But I've had to do this for my mother. I've done it for my sister. And I found that people are so understanding and so compassionate, and everyone really knows what's going on.
 
So I think you have to take the story out of your head, kind of what you are telling yourself, and stick to the facts that you really don't know anything yet until you get on the phone and start making calls. And remember, you will feel in your power when you start kind of taking care of those things one at a time.

Esther Schorr:
That's really good advice, because I think many people that I've talked to have said, "Oh, my God, I dismantled my travel plans. What am I going to do? The airlines are always so mean." And in the end, the vast majority, not all, but the vast majority of those organizations are being much more flexible, because they're all in the same situation. Eucharia, any additional thoughts around that topic?

Eucharia Borden:

I actually think Jennifer gave some great information. But this also calls into question, the anxiety that people have around asking for help, which is what we were just talking about. Because if you're a person who's never had to reach out to the gas company, the electric company, that can feel insurmountable, that I have to actually admit that I'm having financial issues. But there is just—taking that step. And I love what Jennifer said to make that list first. It just starts with that first phone call. In many areas, you may be hearing about the fact that the organizations or companies that you need to pay, are having a no penalty period at this time.
 
So, even different than a normal time in our world, people are being understanding about it. But realize that, you are not alone in having these issues. Which may or may not make you feel comfortable, but it has just created a situation where making those phone calls, and having those discussions, may not be as difficult as you think they will be. In fact, you may not even have to explain as much as you think you have to. So it's really just about taking that step. There are so many organizations that are there right now to help and funds that are there to help. In some cases, the usual financial criteria have been broadened, to just include a larger number of people than usual because of how this is impacting everyone.

Esther Schorr:
That's great. And maybe this is a good time. I have to admit, I don't know the full scope of the work that your organization does, but I suspect that there's some connection here. Do you think you could share with us just some of the things that your organization can provide in terms of support? I know it's not just financial, but…

Eucharia Borden:

,,,oh, absolutely. So, at the Cancer Support Community, we actually have quite a few services that can help at this time, namely, our helpline. And if you go to cancersupportcommunity.org, you will find information about our helpline there. There's even the ability to do a live chat. Normally we have licensed mental health counselors available Monday through Friday, 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, but we've also expanded our hours in the past few weeks, to include weekends from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM, again Eastern Time. And we actually do have a financial navigator available. And we have gotten, we always did get phone calls for people who were having financial issues related to the impact of a cancer diagnosis. In the past few weekends, that has doubled or maybe tripled the number of calls that we have gotten.
 
And this is one of those times where if you're one of those folks who is afraid to pick up the phone, because this is just so far out of your wheelhouse to have to talk to someone about needing help, maybe give a call. Because this is a way to talk about even “How do I have that conversation. How do I deal with that? This is my mortgage. I can't lose my home.” What are the implications of this? Because they're licensed mental health professionals. While we do have the financial navigation available, we can also attend to some of the other anxiety that's surrounding those financial issues as well. But, we're still there to talk about the other issues that are happening too, treatment-related issues, caregiver-related issues. So, the number is +1 888-793-9355.

Esther Schorr:
That's great. And I assume that these services are available nationally, right?

Eucharia Borden:
Yes. This is a national service that we provide for sure.

Esther Schorr:
Okay. That's great. So this is for both of you from Lee, who's asking, he says, "I have guilt about having family worrying about me." So he's a cancer survivor. "How do you make your family feel better about you, when they're so worried?" And I think this was, Jennifer, you touched on that. "We have our 23-year-old son living with us, who refuses to go outside, pretty much because he says he doesn't want to put dad at risk." So how can the patient help their family feel less anxious essentially, or less worried? Any tips on that? Maybe, Jennifer, maybe you should start on that one.

Jennifer Abraham:
Well, what comes to my mind is that, most likely the family and the caregivers have been anxious anyway. When someone in the family has a cancer diagnosis, everyone becomes worried. With this, I know it's heightened. But what I've been telling my daughters, and what has been working for me is that, you know what, I'm living the same way that I always did. And I live a minute at a time, a day at a time, one foot in front of the other. And every day we wake up, it's really a lesson for all of us. That when we wake up, if we can just be grateful, take a breath and realize we are on this planet one more day. And I'm trying too. I have my mother worried, my sister, they're all panicked, and they have this worst case scenario in their head.
 
So I feel like it's become my responsibility along with telling them not to worry, to also take care of myself. So I have to really take care of myself and let them know I'm taking care of myself. I take pictures of myself with the mask. I still don't go anywhere. I wash down everything. I'll send pictures home of the Lysol wipes on the mail. And it's a silly little thing, but I know it makes my mother sleep better at night. I know it makes my girls feel better. So it's twofold. Because people are—they're going to worry about someone with a cancer diagnosis anyway, right? They worry about us during flu season. They worry about us if we cut our leg. But I think—and it's also empowering too, and you can have fun with it. I found that I've had a lot of fun with the masks and the gloves, and kind of going overboard just to let everyone know back home that I'm okay.

Esther Schorr:
Those are great. I mean they're actually I'd love to ask, Eucharia, the fun. This has taken, this potentially takes the fun out of everything. That's the potential. That it's like, this is a real downer. Nobody likes to be stuck at home. We don't make long-term plans. Maybe, this is a good way, and we could talk a few minutes about, what are some of the ways to make this more palatable? From an emotional, mainly an emotional standpoint, but also just daily life, any tips from you? And certainly, Jennifer, chime in about how you can. You mentioned this, Jennifer. Having fun, taking pictures. I know we're doing Zoom chats. What else are you recommending to people to get through this?

Eucharia Borden:

I recommend that it is absolutely okay to laugh, to smile, to have a good time to make the best of this. Now certainly, I can see how someone would think that, this is making light of something that's really serious. I can't do that. But let's face it, this is no longer a sprint, and I think we all know that. We are in the marathon of this. And so you kind of have to settle in to a groove, to a rhythm. Is there something that truly does bring you joy? And I think we've seen more opportunities to connect with those things, whether it's the free concerts that have been offered online or on TV. Whether it's something that someone sends you, like a meme, that really makes you laugh. It's okay. And I think what's most important is giving yourself permission to smile or to laugh.
 
I'm sure that many of you have had the situation where you might have tears, and you're laughing about something at the same time. And I think that, that really highlights where we are right now. Because I don't think that, we're going to be at a place in a day, maybe even in an hour, if it's hard to think about your entire day, where moment to moment you may feel differently about whatever it is that you're facing. And so be serious when you need to be serious. But I think it's unrealistic to expect that all of us are going to be serious in every single moment for weeks on end now. If there was a moment where you feel like, “I just really need to go and scream out my window.” Okay. Do that, as long as your neighbors are not going to be worried about you.

Esther Schorr:
We've actually started, I have to share this. We didn't start it, but I guess this started in Denver or one of the other cities, but our next door neighbor and us, have started this 8 o'clock at night, we open our kitchen windows and we howl at the moon.

Eucharia Borden:
Oh, my gosh, I love it.

Esther Schorr:
I've missed a couple of nights, and now I regret it. But it really is an emotional release. And I would say just anecdotally, our son, we're all trying to stay physically healthy, but trying to minimize, we do go outside and take walks with distancing, that kind of thing, at least Andrew and I do. But my son asked me to work out with him yesterday, and we found ourselves running around our kitchen island to get cardio, and we started laughing hysterically. And so, I am assuming those are the kinds of moments that people need to give themselves permission to have, or put on some music and dance or…

Eucharia Borden:
…absolutely.

Esther Schorr:
Tell bad jokes.

Eucharia Borden:
You know what's happening as a result of that, that sometimes we're missing? There's connection that is taking place. There's community. Sometimes in your other example, there's community that's taking place. And sometimes we can be so focused on just the serious issue at hand, that we missed, that these are actually opportunities to connect with one another. And as a result, people are trying new things.

Esther Schorr:
I don't usually howl at the moon.

Eucharia Borden:
Right, but you know what, in that moment that can be such a cathartic release, that we're all needing in this time. At my house, it's been Disney Zumba, like Zumba, but just to Disney songs—just doing something completely different. But I encourage people to try it. And at first, some of it can feel silly. Let's face it, it might feel silly. But you know what? Maybe we need a little silly right now, sometimes. But those are—start small. I'm not suggesting that everyone start howling out their kitchen windows, but maybe…

Esther Schorr:
…we need company.

Eucharia Borden:
Right. But if there is something happening in your neighborhood, or even to connect with your family members on Zoom together, all of these things are new things to try. So certainly you can start with something that's in your comfort zone, but be willing to try that one new thing, because you may actually find that it helps you to cope better in a situation like this.

Esther Schorr:

All right. Okay. I have one other question, because I know we're getting toward the end of our time together. Oh, Jennifer, do you want to add something on this one?

Jennifer Abraham:
Yeah. Just one thing about that.

Esther Schorr:
Please.

Jennifer Zarou Abraham:

So one of the things that really works for me, and I try and help people with, is to stick to your own story.

Eucharia Borden:
Right.

Jennifer Abraham:
That is, there's a whole big story going on at our windows, right? It's on the television, it's everywhere. But if we wake up and we stick to our story, what's our story? Well, I'm waking up, maybe I'm going to work today, I have two kids at home, one has classes, then there are going to be three or four hours, the sun's going to be out. There's some gardening that needs to be done. That's my story. So it's really helpful if I have this little ritual, I tell people, “You wake up, put your feet on the ground and say, ‘I am grateful that I'm breathing, and what is my story going to be today?’” And it's the simple little thing. And sometimes it might be uncomfortable for people for a while, but then maybe it'll become a habit. We're so used to paying attention to everything else that's going on, we cannot afford to do that now. We have an opportunity to just really live our stories. And I just wanted to emphasize how important that is.

Esther Schorr:
No. No. that's great. There were a number of questions, and we've sort of compiled them together on one issue. Can we say hello to that guy that wants to say hello?

Eucharia Borden:
Oh, my goodness. Are you sure?

Esther Schorr:
Yes. Absolutely.

Eucharia Borden:
Would you like to say hi?

Esther Schorr:
Because that's real life.

Eucharia Borden:
Come here, honey.

Jennifer Abraham:
That makes us smile.

Esther Schorr:

Yeah. This is a good moment. All right when he comes—is he going to come back and say, "Hey!"

Eucharia Borden:
Will you say hello?

Esther Schorr:
How are you?

Harrison:
Good.

Esther Schorr:

What's your name?

Harrison:
Harrison.

Eucharia Borden:
I don't know if you can hear him. Harrison.

Esther Schorr:
Harrison. Harrison, are you glad to have your mom home more?

Harrison:
Yeah.

Esther Schorr:

Yeah. Good.

Eucharia Borden:
One of the things that we've started doing is to have hug breaks during the day. Because, sticking to your own story, like you said Jennifer, the reality is, some of us are home with younger children, and it's important to prioritize them too. So to help him feel connection.

Esther Schorr:
There you go. Well, I won't keep you much longer. I just wanted to address one other thing if it's okay. A number of people have shared with us that, “We're being told wear a mask, perhaps wear gloves. Don't go out if you don't have to.” All of that stuff about being medically safe, but I think at the root of it is, I think people are worried about “Is it even safe to go outside, period?” Especially as a cancer patient or survivor. And I'm just wondering if you guys could quickly comment on, not so much the medical safety, but that psychological barrier of “I'm doing everything I can if I need to go out, should I be able to go out, and how do I make that emotional decision to do it, or not do it, and be comfortable with it?”

Jennifer Abraham:
I don't know if there's a way to be comfortable with it. So, I've been faced with it a little bit. I'm not comfortable with it and…

Esther Schorr:
…and that's okay.

Jennifer Abraham:
I actually—it is okay. And I have actually said out loud, “I'm not sure if I'll go out, or I won't get on a plane. I need a vaccine.” People have asked, "When are you going to feel comfortable?" I said, "When there's a vaccine." So it's really, I think it's that level of honesty, that we kind of started off talking about the level of acceptance. We have to really look at where we are. I also have been speaking to people that have been in remission 10 and 15 years now, out from cancer, but still really, really worried, really panicked. And feeling guilty, should I still be afraid? I haven't had chemo in 15 years. And you know what? Everyone has their own reality. It doesn't matter. There's no set way to feel. And if you don't feel safe, then you know what? It's not safe for you. That's personally how I'm dealing with it.

Esther Schorr:
Okay. Eucharia?

Eucharia Borden:
Yeah, I would agree with that because, it is very much an emotional decision. Regardless of, what you're hearing around you that is suggested. But, it is certainly a conversation that you can have with your medical provider, if you really want the information for yourself, “What are the things that I should be considering essential?” ”I,” this person, “should be considering essential to leave my home?” So those conversations should always take place with a physician or a nurse practitioner or whomever it is that's caring for you. But there is that emotional side of it, and it's really about honoring who you are, and what you are comfortable with. So there are many services, for example, pharmacy delivery, there used to be for some pharmacies, a charge associated with that.
 
Many pharmacies have released that charge. They're doing it at no cost. So if there truly is something that you don't feel comfortable with, even though you had permission, let's say from your physician to do it, then you don't have to do that. Because there is a way to get what you need, get it delivered to you, but really stick with that. But continue to seek the facts as you need them. But, how do those facts fit in with your reality? Is there someone else in your home who is able or willing to do those runs for you? Then you know what, this might get into that area of things that you used to do, because you're the person who to do the grocery shopping, but maybe right now is not that time. This is the time to really have a conversation and figure out how to do this in a way that makes you feel comfortable.

Esther Schorr:

Right. And that, in turn, should reduce your anxiety.

Eucharia Borden:
Exactly.

Esther Schorr:
Accepting who you are, what you're willing to do, and not judging other people either, for their decisions.

Eucharia Borden:
Correct.

Esther Schorr:

So, that's really important. Well, this has been a great discussion. And I have a feeling we may have more of them as time goes on, but before we end, Eucharia, could you just repeat your website and that phone number?

Eucharia Borden:
Oh! Absolutely.

Esther Schorr:
I know there are other resources out there, but I'm guessing, that if your organization can't fill a need, you got a lot of relationships with other organizations that can.

Eucharia Borden:
Absolutely. And that's one of the benefits of reaching out. Because we certainly can get you in touch with whatever resources you need. So we are at cancersupportcommunity.org and our helpline is +1 888-793-9355, and one other resource is something called My Lifeline, which is also a part of the Cancer Support Community. You can go to mylifeline.org, or you can reach it through the Cancer Support Community's website. But it's an opportunity for you to connect with others online in a chat. You can connect with their various discussion boards. So if you're a caregiver looking to connect with other caregivers, you can do that. It's a way to 24/7, we’re available. And actually to help with your resources, we have a calendar there. If there are things that you need help with, you can actually put those things on a calendar, and people can sign up actually to help you accomplish what you need to. So please give us a call, visit our website. We're here to help you. And if there's something that we don't provide, then we can certainly get you connected to an organization or resource that can.

Esther Schorr:

So our two guests have gone away. I want to thank them for their contribution today and participation. And for all of you who are listening, thank you for being with us. Please share this information with your loved ones, and for all of the Patient Power team, this is Esther Schorr. And please remember, knowledge can be the best medicine of all.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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