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Finding Resources Upfront While Fighting Cancer

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Published on April 30, 2015

Patient Empowerment Network (PEN) Board Member, Randy Broad, was diagnosed with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in March of 2008. After being cut open and closed back up, because his condition was ruled out as inoperable, the surgeon told him he had a year left to live. Randy decided that he wasn’t going to leave his assumed fate in the hands of that one surgeon. Seven years later, he is alive because of his will to live. Through self-education of his cancer, and with the support and guidance of LUNGevity and Patient Power, Randy feels like a cancer guru.   

This Content is from Our Partner, the Patient Empowerment Network.

This content was selected by the Patient Power editorial team and was created by a partner, the Patient Empowerment Network. The content is subject to Patient Power’s editorial standards and policies.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

Okay.  Now, I want you to meet a good friend of mine. I mentioned the Patient Empowerment Network.

You’re going to applaud Randy for another reason. Randy is from the Seattle area where I lived many years. Seattle, okay. 

Randy Broad:    

Go Hawks.

Andrew Schorr:                  

Seahawks almost this year in the Super Bowl. And, Randy, how long have you been living with the diagnosis of lung cancer?

Randy Broad:    

Seven years this month.

I was diagnosed in March of 2008, stage III, non-small cell lung cancer, and deemed inoperable. And the surgeon that basically opened me up and sewed me back up told me I had maybe a year to live. So I want to share they’re not always right.  And get a second opinion.  And hopefully, give you hope that you can survive this disease.

I’m living proof. 

Andrew Schorr:

And the Patient Empowerment Network, you’re on the board of that.

Randy Broad:    

I’m on the board. Thank you. I actually met Andrew about two years after I was diagnosed. And I would say that one of the most important things—and also LUNGevity. I met them about the same amount of time.  One of the most important things, especially the people that raised their hand with this disease, is to find that information, be able to go there and learn about it.

I didn’t know about it, again, until about two years afterwards.  And it’s been absolutely a life changer for me. And I believe, as patients, it’s our duty to share this information with other people so that they know. I don’t know about you, but I’ve kind of become a cancer lightning rod. Anybody that gets cancer, people that know me, call me, contact me, ask me for advice.

And I share these two organizations immediately because they’ve been, like I say, invaluable to me in helping me get through this.

Andrew Schorr:

Thank you, Randy, for being here.  

Randy Broad:    

You bet.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.