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How to Prepare For a Virtual Visit With Your Oncologist

How to Prepare For a Virtual Visit With Your Oncologist
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Published on May 7, 2020

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This content provided by our partner:  Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

The number of patients having virtual visits (or telehealth visits) with their doctors and other healthcare providers has skyrocketed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Providers at Dana-Farber and other hospitals are committed to delivering exceptional care throughout the pandemic, whether via in-person appointments or virtual appointments if appropriate for you.

Here are two things you should know right off the bat about telehealth appointments:

The Right Time for TelehealthThe decision to have virtual visits should be a joint one made between you and your doctor.

While appointments requiring an extensive physical exam should always be done in person, other appointments, such as general check-ups with your oncologist or a tutorial on oral chemotherapy, can be managed virtually.

“Once you become comfortable with virtual visits, you can feel just like you’re in the clinic — while in the comfort of your own home,” says Andrew Wagner, MD, PhD, associate chief medical officer at Dana-Farber.

Remember that you’re still receiving expert care — with the added benefit of increased safety during the pandemic.

Wagner and other Dana-Farber physicians say that their remote interactions with patients have been excellent — especially when they include video conferencing.

“The level of interaction and intimacy is remarkable when you can look directly into the eyes of a patient,” says David Dougherty, MD, MBA, medical director of the Dana-Farber Network, which consists of satellite facilities and partnering physician practices outside Boston.

Here are some recommendations from Dougherty and Wagner on how you can make the most of your telehealth visits:

BLOG CallForClarity 1200x800Make time for practice.

Before your first virtual visit, get comfortable with the process. Contact your oncologist’s office for any necessary instructions, and if there is software needed, download it to make sure it’s compatible with your operating system. Then have a practice call with a friend to confirm that your computer and internet connection are running okay and that you can hear and see each other well.

Take a few minutes beforehand to gather your thoughts.

When you come to an in-person visit, you have time during your commute and while in the waiting area to gather your thoughts before seeing your oncologist. Do the same in advance of your telehealth appointment; leave five or 10 minutes for quiet contemplation beforehand. Think of it as your virtual waiting room.

Come prepared.

In advance of your call, write down any questions, concerns, or new symptoms that have emerged since you last saw your oncologist. Have your medications with you as well; many patients forget to do this when they come to the clinic, but it’s very helpful for physicians to be able to ask specific questions about your meds including dosage and ingredients.

Multiple Myeloma Support ResourcesBring loved ones along — including a designated notetaker.

It’s always great to have someone with you at an appointment to lend insights and emotional support, and with virtual visits this is easier than ever. Whether your loved one is seated beside you or joins the appointment by Zoom or telephone, they can be part of the conversation. If possible, recruit a person to take notes during the appointment and then debrief with you after it. If you need one, we can also arrange for an interpreter.

 

Try it with the rest of your care team.

Other members of your care team are also using virtual visits to meet with patients. It’s great to use for oral chemotherapy training from your nurse navigator, to go over your medications, or have a nutrition or social work consult.

Patient Power publishes sponsored content from select partners in order to provide you with access to additional information that may support you on your cancer journey. This should never replace communication with your doctor. This and our other content and discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get the care that’s most appropriate for you.

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