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How Can Personalized Medicine Change Prostate Cancer Treatment?

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Published on February 18, 2019

How do doctors evaluate which treatment is right for each individual prostate cancer patient? Renowned prostate cancer expert Dr. Maha Hussain, from the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, discusses different stressors patients experience from a prostate cancer diagnosis, what to consider when weighing treatment options and how treatment decision-making is guided in the age of precision medicine. Tune in to find out more. 

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power in partnership with Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. We thank Astellas, Clovis Oncology and Pfizer for their support. These organizations have no editorial control. Patient Power is solely responsible for program content.

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Transcript | How Can Personalized Medicine Change Prostate Cancer Treatment?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

Dr. Hussain, we’re in the age of personalized medicine, so that’s part of the decision-making that you do with the patient, with the family, right, is what’s right for that individual, correct? 

Dr. Hussain:                

Absolutely. I think this is one of the longest conversations, because you’re dealing with the stress of knowing you have a cancer. That word is scary to everybody. There is not a—I can’t even say anything that says, oh, it’s okay because it is a scary word to patients and their families. There is the whole mental stress part of it, then there is the stress of what it means down the road, and then there is the stress of needing to make the decision about the treatment. There is also the stress to patients about what treatment to pick and what are the potential side effects, because remember, most people are asymptomatic. They’re just going about their life, and suddenly, they get diagnosed with the cancer. 

We try to very much individualize when—and we talk about personalized, it’s really personalized at the macro and micro level, which means at the patient-doctor interaction and their choices with regard to what they prefer, all the way down to, obviously, downstream in terms of the biology of the cancer itself. The good news is this, is that, in most places, and if they’re not—if this info is not available, there is the potential for patients to have access to material, but I do think that, in most places, there are support systems available for patients to help them and guide them in terms of a decision-making.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.