Skip to Navigation Skip to Search Skip to Content
Search All Centers

What Does PSA Indicate About Prostate Cancer Progression?

Read Transcript Download/Print Transcript

Published on March 20, 2018

What do the results from a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test reveal about progression and bone metastasis? Is there normal range for PSA levels? Prostate cancer expert Dr. Celestia Higano from Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, shares what patients should know about their PSA level, and how it impacts the disease course and prostate cancer treatment plan. Watch now to learn more about what your PSA level means on your journey with prostate cancer.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power in partnership with Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. We thank Astellas and Sanofi for their support.

Featuring

Partners

Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

Sponsors

Patient Empowerment Network Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

You might also like

Transcript | What Does PSA Indicate About Prostate Cancer Progression?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jeff Folloder:              

Excellent. Dr. Higano, one of our participants asks, “Is there a PSA number or a speed that’s indicative that the cancer is going to the bone?” 

Dr. Higano:                

No.

Jeff Folloder:              

See? That was easy.

Dr. Higano:                

No. This is a common question. The PSA means something different in each individual.

You just heard two cases where the PSA was 18, and it was—and, in the other case, it was in the normal range. But, in each case, there was a significant amount of cancer. So, the absolute PSA number can mean something different in each person. That’s the first thing. So, we can’t say, “Oh, 50 equals bone metastasis.” Nope. You can’t do that. You can’t even say 100. You can’t even say 1,000. 

The second thing is even in each patient, over time—and, we just heard from someone who’s had the disease for 21 years—over time, and with treatment, the meaning of the PSA may be something different than it used to be five, or eight, or 10 years ago. So those are things that we try to educate our patients about.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.