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CyberKnife: How Could It Be Used to Treat Prostate Cancer?

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Published on March 21, 2018

What is CyberKnife, and when should prostate cancer patients consider using it for treatment? Leading prostate cancer expert Dr. Celestia Higano from the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance explains how this investigational therapy works, what it’s designed to target, and who is a candidate for this type of therapy.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power in partnership with Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. We thank Astellas and Sanofi for their support.

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Transcript | CyberKnife: How Could It Be Used to Treat Prostate Cancer?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That's how you’ll get care that's most appropriate for you.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you

Jeff Folloder:        
      

Doctor, we also had some other—more abrupt approaches to treatment: This thing called a CyberKnife—which sounds like something from a George Lucas film—and other surgical options. What does that look like for the metastatic advanced prostate cancer patient?

Dr. Higano:                

So, I need to clarify: What does “CyberKnife” really mean? “CyberKnife” makes it sound like it’s a surgical approach, and guess what? It’s not. So, CyberKnife is actually a trade name for stereotactic body radiation therapy, SBRT. It’s called a knife because it’s so precise if you were doing a surgical excision.

And, on your slide, I think you have it correctly placed in terms of treating specific lesions. They could be bone lesions, they could be nodal lesions, they could be liver lesions, lung lesions—CyberKnife or SBRT can be used in many parts of the body, not just the bone. We happen to use it a lot—or, I should clarify that – I happen to use it a lot. At the moment, this approach is really still investigational, I would say. So, I think this approach of dealing with targeting spots that you could treat if there are not too many spots that need to be treated is something that’s undergoing clinical trials right now.

I think for certain people, that will be an approach that’s reasonable.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.