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Q&A: Do the Heart and Lungs Compete for Oxygen in Lung Cancer Patients?

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Published on August 26, 2015

Transcript | Q&A: Do the Heart and Lungs Compete for Oxygen in Lung Cancer Patients?

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Carol Preston:

So the question is are the heart and the lungs starting to compete for oxygen?

Dr. Carbone:       

Well, we need both.  I mean, the heart moves the blood through the lungs, which is what gets oxygen into the blood. And so I think both are needed. And I’m not really sure what the question there is. 

Andrew Schorr:                  

Scott, let me ask this question. So after I survived six months of chemo and all that, at some point, my oncologist said, “You should think about a baby aspirin.”

I said, “Huh?” I said, “We’re not talking about chemo for cancer?” He said, “No, for your heart. You’re getting older.”  And I said, “But I was worried about dying of cancer.” So if we’re successful in moving the needle where people can live longer having been diagnosed with lung cancer, do we have to think about other things that happen as we get older?

Dr. Antonia:        

Again, obviously, we’re speaking in generalities here today. So every person is different.  And there are some people who are doing badly. And they’re not responding to treatment.  And maybe they don’t need their annual colonoscopy that time.  But if they get better, and they get put on a trial, and they’ve on nivolumab (Opdivo), and they get better, and they go back to playing golf, etc., sorry, you’ve got to check your cholesterol.

You’ve got to get your mammograms.  You’ve got to live your life like the cancer is not going to be active for a while.

 Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

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